Wolfie the Bunny: A Picture Book Review

Wolfie the Bunny by Ame Dyckman and Zachariah OHoraWhen a baby wolf is left on the doorstep of the Bunny family, Dot has some serious concerns. Much to Dot’s dismay she is alone in her fears as Mama and Papa soon adopt the abandoned wolf. Dot remains worried about Wolfie as he grows and becomes much more likely to eat them all up. Worse, Wolfie really loves Dot–so much so that he spends all of his time following Dot around and even drooling on her!

Dot is certain Wolfie could not be more annoying until she and Wolfie go to the local co-op The Carrot Patch to get more food for the family. Dot is sure this moment will be when Wolfie chooses to make his move and eat her. Instead, when a mean (big) bear shows up, it’s Wolfie who is in peril. And Dot who is left to do the rescuing in Wolfie the Bunny (2015) by Ame Dyckman and Zachariah OHora.

Ame Dyckman returns with another delightful story in this picture book about a wolf in rabbit’s clothing. Wolfie the Bunny is a riotous story that leaves readers wondering if Dot’s fears really are warranted until the last moment when readers (and Dot) realize that being family means being there for each other no matter what.

OHora brings an extra dimension to the story as he moves Wolfie and company from what could have been a natural setting into the wilds of Brooklyn. His signature style and bold colors in each acrylic painting guarantee that these illustrations will stand up to close scrutiny as well as being viewed from a distance.

Bold text and a variety of font faces work to add further interest to each page as each page spread comes together seamlessly to create an engrossing read.

Wolfie the Bunny is a story about new babies, sibling rivalry and unconditional love (and maybe carrots) that is brimming over with humor and enthusiastic energy. Ideal for any story time scenario.

You can also read my interview with Ame and Zachariah!

Creepy Carrots: A (Spooky) Picture Book Review

Jasper Rabbit loves carrots. He eats them on the way to school. He eats them going to Little League. He eats them going home.

Jasper especially loves the free carrots he can grab from Crackenhopper Field any time he wants.

At least he does until those creepy carrots start to follow him around. No one else sees what Jasper sees. But that doesn’t mean he’s wrong in Creepy Carrots (2012) by Aaron Reynolds and Peter Brown.

Reynolds’ concise writing keeps up the tension as Jasper gets more and more creeped out by those carrots. Readers will be kept on their toes until the (maybe) surprising ending. Brown’s illustrations, done in black and white with shots of orange for the carrots, add an eerie quality to this already spooky story.

A light touch from both author and illustrator guarantee that this story will be fun for readers of all ages without being too scary. A perfect choice to read around Halloween–or anytime you’re in the mood for a little scare and a lot of humor.

Possible Pairings: The Spider and the Fly by Tony DiTerlizzi, The Monsters’ Monster by Patrick McDonnell