In Some Other Life: A Review

Three years ago Kennedy Rhodes made a choice. She turned down admission to elite Windsor Academy to stay in public school near her crush.

Three years later it seems like Kennedy made the right choice. She and Austin are still dating, she has good grades, and she has completely revamped the school newspaper making it an award winning student paper (and chasing a record breaking fourth year win). Windsor Academy students have a much higher probability of getting into Columbia, but Kennedy knows that the student paper will set her over the top. It has to.

When she finds out that her boyfriend has been seeing her best friend in secret, Kennedy wishes she made a different choice. And, thanks to a knock on the head, Kennedy wakes up in that other life where she chose to attend Windsor Academy after all. But as Kennedy explores her shiny new life she starts to realize there might not be one right choice, especially when nothing is quite what she expects, in In Some Other Life (2017) by Jessica Brody.

Brody’s latest standalone novel offers a fun blend of contemporary and light fantasy as Kennedy tries to answer that ineffable question: “What if?”

Structured like an if/then equation (half of the books chapters are titled with “if” scenarios, the other half with “then” outcomes) this story explores both paths Kennedy could have taken complete with her delightfully precocious younger brother explaining the ins and outs of the parallel universe theory.

Kennedy’s first person narration can be grating thanks to the obvious chip on her shoulder thanks to her singular focus on all of her disadvantages and obstacles on the path to Columbia instead of her assets and successes. In Some Other Life uses an innovative structure to good effect and offers a well-rounded story that proves the tried and true adage about grass being greener. Recommended for readers who enjoy plot driven stories as well as alternate history or parallel universe tales in general.

Possible Pairings: In a World Just Right by Jen Brooks, The Infinity of You & Me by J. Q. Coyle, Two Summers by Aimee Friedman, Parallel by Lauren Miller, Just Like Fate by Cat Patrick and Suzanne Young, The Square Root of Summer by Harrier Reuter Hapgood, Now That You’re Here by Amy K. Nichols, Pivot Point by Kasie West

*An advance copy of this title was provided by the publisher for review consideration*

A Week of Mondays: A Chick Lit Wednesday Review

A Week of Mondays by Jessica BrodyEllison Sparks is having the worst Monday ever. She runs a red light and gets a ticket while driving herself and her best friend, Owen, to school. She forgets her umbrella and gets soaked in the rain. Right before it’s time to take her school picture which turns out terribly, of course. She gives the worst election speech for Junior Class Vice-President in the history of ever. She doesn’t make the cut at softball tryouts. Worst of all her dreamy, rockstar boyfriend Tristan dumps her. At the carnival. On what should have been their dream date.

Ellie knows if she just had a second chance she could get Monday right. But what happens when she gets seven chances?

As Ellie tries again and again (and so on) to get her Monday right she starts to realize that maybe the dream Monday she’s been chasing isn’t so perfect after all in A Week of Mondays (2016) by Jessica Brody.

Find it on Bookshop.

A Week of Mondays is a fun standalone novel. Although there are some fantasy elements with the repeating day (reminiscent of the movie Groundhog Day), this novel is contemporary at its heart and will appeal to fans of that genre.

Brody makes good use of the repeating days to flesh out Ellie’s character and explore different aspects of her life over the course of this unusual week. Readers will also see the scope of the book’s plot expand as Ellie begins to delve into other parts of her day including why her parents are fighting every morning and what problems her younger sister is facing at school.

While some of Ellie’s decisions may seem obvious to readers from the start, this story is more about the journey than the destination. Ellie’s character development and growth over the course the novel more than makes up for any predictability to the plot. The payoff at the end of Ellie’s “week” also seamlessly brings every repeated Monday together for a satisfying conclusion to a truly enjoyable story.

A Week of Mondays is a sweet, optimistic novel with a breezy narrative and tons of humor. Highly recommended for readers looking for a new fun diversion.

Possible Pairings: The Queen of Bright and Shiny Things by Ann Aguirre, The Best Night of Your (Pathetic) Life by Tara Altebrando, Bookishly Ever After by Isabel Bandeira, Tell Me Three Things by Julie Buxbaum, So Much Closer by Susane Colasanti, Better Off Friends by Elizabeth Eulberg, To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han, Four Days of You and Me by Miranda Kenneally, Shuffle, Repeat by Jen Klein, The Museum of Heartbreak by Meg Leder, Everything All at Once by Katrina Leno, The Boyfriend List by E. Lockhart, The Start of Me and You by Emery Lord, The Square Root of Summer by Harriet Reuter Hapgood, Bookish Boyfriends: A Date With Darcy by Tiffany Schmidt, The Night of Your Life by Lydia Sharp, The Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E. Smith, P. S. I Like You by Kasie West

*An advance copy of this title was provided by the publisher for review consideration*