Black, White and Red Book Display (Library Life)

Last month’s Blind Date with a Book display was a stunning success. I have never had to restock a display so often. I have never gotten so much positive feedback.

Unfortunately even if I had wanted to keep the display going, the level of work involved was unsustainable. I plan to bring something similar back for Banned Books Week and also for Halloween (masked books anyone?!) and of course next Valentine’s Day. In the mean time I decided to keep things simple.

This simplicity also stems from the fact that someone walked out of the library with one of my Blind Date with a Book signs. No one knows when or how it was stolen but it is gone. That smaller display is also by a heating vent and too small to accommodate the foam core I use for my display table. Instead of trying to find a new piece of cardboard I decided to commandeer a plastic sign holder and just use that to hold the sign display since that part is always 8.5 by 11 anyway.

For March I wanted something simple and after tossing around some ideas on Twitter I decided I wanted to do a color based display.

Here’s what I came up with:

bwr1If you think too long about the display text, it’s going to fall apart because the “red” should really be “read” if we are going by the old joke. But I really wanted to have black and white and red books so I just went with it.

The backing for my big sign is construction paper which I randomly and luckily found while assembling pieces. The actual sign was made in PicMonkey as usual and I just printed out two copies.

Here’s the smaller display (When I took this picture it was still stocked with my last four blind date wrapped books which were white so it works!):

IMG_2033I’ll leave you all with a close up of my sign that details the giveaway option for the month as well.

IMG_2032What color displays have you made or seen in the library? Do you organize your shelves by color? Tell me everything in the comments!

 

Shadow Scale: A Chick Lit Wednesday Review

“The world is seldom so simple that it hinges on us alone.”

Shadow Scale by Rachel HartmanThe kingdom of Goredd has had an uneasy peace with the dragons found in the neighboring Tanamoot for the past forty years–a time in which the arts have flourished while Goredd’s dragon-fighting tools have languished.

When mounting tensions between humans and dragons threatens to draw Goredd into the middle of another treacherous war, Seraphina reluctantly finds herself as the center of the conflict. Goredd has few tools left to fight dragons save for rumors of a magical weapon used during the Age of Saints. A weapon Seraphina might be able to recreate with help from other half-dragons like herself.

After spending years hiding her true self, Seraphina sets out across kingdoms to seek out the other half-dragons–beings she’s only ever previously encountered in her own mind–before war breaks out.

As Seraphina gathers her motley band of allies, she soon realizes that war is not the only threat to the half-dragons, her kingdom, or even herself. With so many trying to stop her, Seraphina will have to embrace her true identity, and the ramifications it will have for herself and the other half-dragons, if she has any hope of stopping this senseless war in Shadow Scale (2015) by Rachel Hartman.

Shadow Scale is the highly anticipated sequel to Hartman’s debut novel Seraphina. While this book does an excellent job of explaining key events from book one, it’s still crucial to read these in order.

Every aspect of Shadow Scale is handled brilliantly and often surpasses the achievements and charms of Seraphina, which is no small feat. This book is intricate, clever and often unexpected as many given facts from Seraphina are challenged or turned upside down.

Shadow Scale picks up shortly after the conclusion of Seraphina but soon moves the story in a new direction as readers learn more about Seraphina’s connection to the other half-dragons and how she uses her mind garden to interact with them. Where Hartman’s first book is about Seraphina finding herself, Shadow Scale is surely about Seraphina finding her place in the world.

Hartman blows  Seraphina’s world wide open in Shadow Scale as she crosses borders and visits neighboring kingdoms in her search for the other half-dragons. This book is the full package complete with a map and glossary to highlight all of the wonderful details that Hartman has included in this much-expanded world.

The way different plot threads and pieces of this world knit together is fascinating and wondrous to behold as this story asks (and sometimes answers) questions about ethics, friendship, love and even what being family can really mean. I can’t wait to see what Hartman does next.

Shadow Scale is a satisfying and often surprising conclusion to a story where nothing is ever truly neat or perfect but everything does have the potential to be beautiful. Highly recommended.

Possible Pairings: Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson, The Darkest Minds by Alexandra Bracken, Graceling by Kristin Cashore, A Creature of Moonlight by Rebecca Hahn, Princess of Thorns by Stacey Jay, Grave Mercy by Robin LaFevers, A Tale of Two Castles by Gail Carson Levine, Dragonsong by Anne McCaffrey, Cinder by Marissa Meyer, Sabriel by Garth Nix, The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner, All These Things I’ve Done by Gabrielle Zevin

*An advance copy of this book was acquired from the publisher for review consideration*

Top Ten Tuesday: Spring TBR

Top Ten Tuesdays img by Miss Print

This type of post always lines up nicely with my monthly reading tracker. Here’s March: http://wp.me/p6kfM-4qr

  1. Loop by Karen Akins
  2. The Witch Hunter by Virginia Boecker
  3. Dove Arising by Karen Bao
  4. Snow Like Ashes by Sara Raasch
  5. The Weight of Stars by Tessa Gratton
  6. I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson
  7. Hold me Like a Breath by Tiffany Schmidt
  8. Becoming Jinn by Lori Goldstein
  9. The Chapel Wars by Lindsay Leavitt
  10. The Unnaturalists by Tiffany Trent

My committee work is probably going to amp up this month so I’m sadly not sure how many of these I’ll get to but this is the plan.

What’s on your spring to read pile?

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. (Image made by me.)

I Remember You: A Review

I Remember You by Cathleen Davitt BellLucas and Juliet have nothing in common. Juliet is an overachiever who, even as a junior, already has plans for college and law school. Lucas knows that at the end of his senior year he will enlist in the Marines–just like his father and countless other relatives.

Still, Juliet finds herself drawn to Lucas even as common sense tells her she should be afraid. Despite just meeting, just starting to know each other, Lucas says he remembers their entire relationship from their first kiss to their first fight and even how they break up.

Juliet doesn’t know if she should be more worried about Lucas or herself when she starts to believe him. As they grow closer, Lucas’ memories begin to come with more frequency and much more foreboding. Juliet wants desperately to keep Lucas safe with her in the present but she doesn’t know how to do that when she has already lost him in the future in I Remember You (2015) by Cathleen Davitt Bell.

I Remember You sounds like a fantasy. It is not. Instead I Remember You reads superficially as a contemporary romance with one (supposedly though with no explanation given) supernatural element. Except it’s technically historical because most of the book is set in 1994. (It becomes clear early on that Juliet is relating past events from a point in the future as an adult which also raises questions about whether this book even is YA in the truest sense but that’s a different discussion.)

Upon closer reading, the problems in I Remember You begin to mount. A lot of how readers react to I Remember You depends on how they feel about Juliet and Lucas (both separately and as a couple).

Working from the initial fact that Lucas and Juliet have nothing in common beyond proximity in Physics class (the only class they have together since the rest of Juliet’s schedule consists of Honors classes), it’s incredibly hard to believe these two characters would ever embark on a relationship, let alone an epic one that seems poised to defy time and space. This uncertainty about the two main characters ever connecting casts the entire initial premise of the book in doubt but if you can get past it, then maybe this book will work for you.

That is assuming you can also get past the fact that when Juliet and Lucas first begin to talk, Juliet is afraid of him. It’s important to point out that Juliet is also drawn to Lucas and there is definitely mutual attraction. But the key point here is that Juliet is afraid of Lucas when he starts to talk about remembering their relationship. If you can get past fear being as key to this relationship as attraction, then maybe this book will work for you.

Plot-wise, I Remember You is going to be familiar because it reads like countless other romantic first love stories.

Character-wise, there are also a lot of familiar faces. Juliet is the calm, focused, over-achiever-with-her-eye-on-the-prize. Lucas is the jock with a surprising amount of depth but also the boy who is going to leave everything behind to enlist. Add to the mix a single mother (Juliet’s), a disillusioned father and harried mother (Lucas’s) and you start to check off a lot of character archetypes.

Juliet’s best friend Rosemary also features. Rosemary–sometimes Rose–is gorgeous and she knows it. She also uses it at every opportunity to manipulate men (men because she is 16 and dating college students) to give her gifts and adoration. Rosemary’s outlook on life seems to be “love ‘em and leave ‘em” which would not raise any eyebrows if she were a boy and it is an interesting choice here. Except it all leads to rather disastrous consequences for Rosemary (and Lucas and Juliet) as one relationship escalates into stalking territory. Furthermore, without actually discussing that Rosemary is trying to parlay her looks into agency the entire thing falls flat and we are instead left with a one-note character who is manipulative and often quite mean.

Then we have Lucas’ best friend Dexter. Poor, hapless Dexter with his sad, hopeless crush on Rosemary. Dexter is used and abused in this story when he appears seemingly out of nowhere so that Rosemary will have a new guy to chew up and spit out. Dexter is shy. He has bad hair and he wears baggy clothes. He is also almost certainly white. Dexter eventually gets his day which comes in the form of a good haircut that highlights his inherent good looks. So far so good. Then Juliet says the haircut makes people notice things about Dexter including the fact that he has cheekbones like a Lenape warrior. There is no scenario in which that description can be interpreted as anything but the worst kind of cultural appropriation.

In addition to these problems, I Remember You often handles the fact of Lucas’ imminent enlistment very poorly. Juliet never truly accepts that being a Marine is something Lucas very deeply wants and not something he is being forced into. (There is a hint of familial obligation here since Lucas likely wants to gain approval from his father. But at the same time Lucas has two younger brothers who do not seem to share his aspirations so maybe there isn’t that much familial pressure after all?)

Later in the novel, Juliet describes herself as a pacifist. She goes on to talk about Lucas’ decision to enlist with what can only be called disdain. This disdain is especially troubling given the fact that the book has already established that Lucas is not as smart as Juliet (per their classes) and perhaps from the wrong side of the tracks (or at least the bad part of town).

Juliet’s friends are horrified by Lucas’ choice and have an even more pervasive dislike not only of him but perhaps the entire military as they clearly see Lucas (and by extension anyone who joins the military) as somehow lacking. Both viewpoints seemed reductive and distasteful. Is it not possible to be a pacifist while also holding at least some respect for our troops and the risks they take to protect our country?

In terms of unlikely romance, I Remember You is about as unlikely as it gets. I Remember You may appeal on a surface level to readers looking for a book to transition into YA as well as fans of The Time Traveler’s Wife or Nicholas Sparks. Readers who give their novels closer inspection may find more to fault than to praise.

Possible Pairings: The Impossible Knife of Memory by Laurie Halse Anderson, The Future of Us by Jay Asher and Carolyn Mackler, How to Love by Katie Cotungo, The Secrets We Keep by Trisha Leaver, Now That You’re Here by Amy K. Nichols, The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger, The Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E. Smith, Safe Haven by Nicholas Sparks, Time Between Us by Tamara Ireland Stone, Pivot Point by Kasie West

Week in Review: March 15

missprintweekreview

This week on the blog you can check out:

Doing my taxes this week was pretty soul crushing. If you ever want to discuss the failings of the new Healthcare Marketplace, I am here and ready.

I had a low level panic attack from Sunday through Monday night which was about as great as it sounds. I am feeling better now though still mad every time I think about my taxes.

Otherwise the week was okay and I am reminded to be grateful for what I do have (a job, a healthy mom) instead of what I don’t have (money to pay these stupid taxes).

I am also still selling some books/giving away some arcs to anyone (in the US) who can cover shipping: https://missprint.wordpress.com/2015/03/07/books-for-sale/

How was your week?

All the Truth That’s in Me: A Review

allthetruthinmeFour years ago Judith disappeared from the small town of Roswell Station. Two years ago she came back with no explanation, no longer able to speak.

Shamed by her loss of speech and shunned by everyone from her former friends to her own family, Judith subsists on small glimpses of Lucas, the boy she has always loved, and the one-sided conversation she has with him in her head.

When homelanders threaten to attack Roswell Station, Judith is forced into action as she tries to save the town that has all but forsaken her. Her efforts to stop the invaders prove successful but also raise questions about Judith’s return to town and what she might have suffered during her time away.

Judith has survived these past two years well enough. In order to flourish, she will have to find her voice in All the Truth That’s in Me (2013) by Julie Berry.

All the Truth That’s in Me is Berry’s first novel written for young adults.

Written in the second person as Judith talks directly to Lucas, this novel is part mystery and part coming of age story. Sparse, short chapters and a stark narrative style make this novel ideal for fans of verse novels.

Berry situates the story in a quasi-historical, quasi-Puritanical society. While this environment works well for the plot (and indeed creates one of the only scenarios where Judith’s shunning would make sense) it is also a distraction that feels more like a shortcut in world building and research. While the society does raise questions about freedom and feminism especially, those questions become difficult to answer or even fully discuss with a lack of concrete setting.

Questions about setting aside, this novel does offer a taut and atmospheric story. Readers are thrown directly into Judith’s claustrophobic and often heartbreaking life as she struggles with cruel treatment and bitter memories.

Although this novel was a finalist for the Edgar Award, it is surprisingly thin on mystery. Answers are sought when Judith tries to unravel the secrets surrounding the disappearance of her friend (a girl who went missing near when Judith herself was taken) but the need to investigate is not especially pressing until the final act. A certain urgency is implied early in the story as the homelanders approach only to taper off in a similar fashion in the wake of the attack.

While there is mystery, All the Truth That’s in Me is really a meandering story about a girl trying to find herself (and her voice) after years of being lost–a story, it is worth mentioning, that is told quite well.

Possible Pairings: Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson, Plain Kate by Erin Bow, Wicked Girls by Stephanie Hemphill, Madapple by Christina Meldrum, The Caged Graves by Dianne K. Salerni, The Near Witch by Victoria Schwab, The Ghosts of Heaven by Marcus Sedgwick, The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare

*A copy of this book was acquired from the publisher for review consideration at BEA 2013*

Author Interview: Kat Ellis on Blackfin Sky

Kat Ellis author photoKat Ellis’ debut novel Blackfin Sky was an unexpected reading gem when I discovered it in 2014. It’s a book I’ve thought of often, and fondly, since reading it as I remember the evocative setting and the quirky characters. It’s also one I hope, you will consider picking up as well. I’m thrilled to have Kat here today to talk about her debut novel.

Miss Print (MP): Can you tell us a bit about your path as a writer? How did you get to this point?

Kat Ellis (KE): I enjoyed writing all through school, but didn’t really think about becoming an author until I was in my mid-twenties. So, I decided – very much on a whim – to write a book.

Naturally, I put in zero research, sat glued to my laptop for three months with my hands hardening into lightning-claws, until I finally had the crappiest of crap drafts to show for it. At that point I realized I’d need to do a lot better than that if I wanted to snag the attention of a literary agent and publisher, so I started reading books about how to write a good novel, and researching the process of publishing.

MP: What was the inspiration for Blackfin Sky?

KE: The starting point of the story – that Skylar Rousseau has drowned and been buried for three months when she shows up at school as though nothing has happened – snaked its way into my brain of its own accord. I liked the idea, and was looking for a genre-shift (up to that point I’d been working mostly on sci-fi and fantasy stories) so I decided to run with it, and build a story around how Skylar could possibly have reappeared.

I then got horribly stuck. I had ideas about how it might have happened, and why she might not remember it, but nothing seemed like the right solution for the plot. I was stuck in this rut when I went on a family outing to the traveling circus which comes to my town every summer. It was there, sitting in the stands, that I figured out the rest of what happened to Skylar during those missing months.

MP: One of the best things in Blackfin Sky is that the town of Blackfin is so very evocative. Did you look to any real locations while creating this fictional town?

KE: I love taking photographs, and when I’m not writing, I’m usually out photographing the local landmarks and creepifying them for my Tumblr. There are a number of places I photographed when I was thinking of locations to fit the story, including a centuries-old cemetery, a Victorian pier, a ruined chapel in the woods… all over the North Wales landscape, basically. And one of my neighbors, whosegarden backs onto mine, has a shed with a rusting weathervane perched on top of it (it’s possible I might have spent a minute or two staring at it through my kitchen window).

MP: Do you–or did yo ever–live in a town like Blackfin? If not, would would want to?

KE: My town isn’t all that much like Blackfin, but I think a number of places I spent time while I was growing up definitely influenced me when I wrote it. In particular, when I was little I used to go and stay with my grandmother in a tiny village surrounded by hills, in her old stone house overlooking thevillage cemetery. I used to love playing there, and never understood why people thought cemeteries were creepy.

That said, even I think Blackfin is pretty weird, and I probably wouldn’t want to live there.

MP: Without getting into spoilers, we learn that Sky and some of the other residents in Blackfin have unique talents or abilities. If you could, what special talent or ability would you want to have?

KE: Literary osmosis! If I could somehow instantly upload books into my head, or download them from my brain onto the page, that would be absolutely amazing. I say this as I’m staring down the barrel ofa TBR pile that could tip over and bury me at any second, and more stories to write than I will ever have time to finish.

MP: Blackfin Sky includes quite a few revelations for Sky and her family over the course of the novel. How did you lay out the pacing of this story? How did you decide when to reveal key details to the reader?

KE: A few people have told me Blackfin Sky is like a giant jigsaw, with lots of tiny pieces that all lock together by the end. (I love this comparison, by the way.) Truthfully, I had to write it out in layers. First came the main plot arc, then I wove in a subplot thread, then another, and another… It got messy at times. That was where having fantastic critique partners, editors, and an agent came in veryhandy!

MP: Can you tell us anything about your next project?

KE: I can! Breaker is my next book, and it will be released Spring 2016 from Running Press Teen.

Breaker is about Kyle, a serial killer’s son who enrolls in a new school after his father is executed, and finds himself drawn to a girl in his class – only to discover she is the daughter of his father’s last victim.

MP: Do you have any advice to offer aspiring authors?

KE: Read as much as you possibly can. Books in the genre/area you want to write, books outside that genre/area, books and articles on writing craft, and about the publishing industry. Find other writers who will give you feedback on your work. Do the same for them. Practice writing until you hate words, then practice until you love them again.

Thanks again to Kat for a great interview.

You can see more about Kat and her books on her website.

You can also read my review of Blackfin Sky here on the blog.