Top Ten Tuesday: Book Titles That Are Complete Sentences

Long titles are the best titles so it was fun picking these books with titles that are complete sentence. Click the titles to read my reviews.

  1. All These Things I’ve Done by Gabrielle Zevin
  2. The Darkest Minds by Alexandra Bracken
  3. Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo
  4. I Wanna Be Where You Are by Kristina Forest
  5. No One Here is Lonely by Sarah Everett
  6. Recommended For You by Laura Silverman
  7. Killing November by Adriana Mather
  8. A Fierce and Subtle Poison by Samantha Mabry
  9. The Once and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow
  10. Do You Dream of Terra-Two? by Temi Oh

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

Top Ten Tuesday: Books with Nature on the Cover

As my graphic shows, I love trees and nature imagery so this was a fun one to pick books for. Click the covers below to read my reviews!

Ever Cursed by Corey Ann HayduThe Kingdom of Back by Marie Lu

An Unkindness of Magicians by Kat HowardYou Have a Match by Emma LordInto the Heartless Wood by Joanna Ruth MeyerTales From the Hinterland by Melissa AlbertGirl, Serpent, Thorn by Melissa BashardoustA Treason of Thorns by Laura E. WeymouthSpindle and Dagger by J. Anderson CoatsThe Guinevere Deception by Kiersten White

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Most Recent Reads (Reviews)

Instead of sharing my ten most recent reads, I thought it would be fun to share my ten most recent review posts here on the blog (click the titles to read my full review):

  1. Amber & Clay by Laura Amy Schlitz, illustrated by Julia Iredale: What begins as a story about a spoiled girl and a common boy becomes, in the author’s capable hands, a much larger commentary on art, friendship, and identity as we watch Melisto and Rhaskos transform, becoming “the girl as electric as amber, the boy, indestructible as clay.”
  2. Mayhem by Estelle Laure: Mayhem is ideal for readers who like their witches fierce and their vampire references vintage.
  3. Everyone Dies Famous in a Small Town by Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock: Recommended for short story fans and readers of suspense.
  4. Somewhere Between Bitter and Sweet by Laekan Zea Kemp: A thoughtful, fast-paced story perfect for readers looking for a romance with an unlikely connection and delicious food descriptions.
  5. Can We Talk About Consent?: A Book About Freedom, Choices, and Agreement by Justin Hancock, illustrated by Fuchsia Macaree: Unfortunately a book design that seemingly failed to consider that this book has to be read makes it difficult to easily interface with much of that information–particularly for anyone who is visually impaired or needs larger and clearer text to read.
  6. Firekeeper’s Daughter by Angeline Boulley: A taut, perfectly plotted mystery with a protagonist readers won’t soon forget. Highly recommended.
  7. Pointe by Brandy Colbert: This is a messy story about a terrible turn of events and, at the end, an impossible decision.
  8. Ever Cursed by Corey Ann Haydu: Recommended for readers with an equal interest in feminism (or feminist theory) and fairy tales.
  9. Verona Comics by Jennifer Dugan: Dugan is a great writer and brings all of the fun (and less fun) elements of the comics world to life in this inventive take on Shakespeare’s classic play.
  10. The Secret Recipe for Moving On by Karen Bischer: Readers looking for a fun rom com should pick this one up with caution.

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

ARC Adoption Program Updates

You may have noticed that my ARC Adoption page was quiet.

It’s back now and updated with streamline due dates, and open to anyone with a platform where they can share long form reviews.

Details, requirements, and available titles can be found here: https://missprint.wordpress.com/adopt/

Top Ten Tuesday: Colorful Book Covers

This prompt was too fun to pass up! Click any of the covers below to see my review.

Don't Date Rosa Santos by Nina MorenoFollow Your Arrow by Jessica VerdiHappily Ever Afters by Elise BryantFelix Ever After by Kacen Callender

Amelia Unabridged by Ashley SchumacherYou Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson

Lucky Caller by Emma MillsWe Are the Wildcats by Siobhan Vivian

Past Perfect by Leila Sales The Light at the Bottom of the World by London Shah

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

Top Ten Tuesday: Fictional Places I’d Love to Live

Would I survive in any of these settings, debatable. But I’d still love to try living in some of these books (click the title to read my reviews):

  1. Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones
  2. Sabriel by Garth Nix
  3. The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner
  4. The Cruel Prince by Holly Black
  5. Caraval by Stephanie Garber
  6. Brightly Woven by Alexandra Bracken
  7. Practical Magic by Alice Hoffman
  8. The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow
  9. Jane, Unlimited by Kristin Cashore
  10. The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

Everything You Need To Know About Donating Books to the Library (And What to Do With Them Instead)

If you’re a part of Library Twitter, you might have seen a thread from me about libraries and book donations. I’ve compiled all of that information here with some other useful links and an infographic at the bottom of this post:

Why Your Library Might Not Want Your Books:

  • Libraries have to consider the cost of materials and labor: Book donations are often more costly to the library than you think. The library needs to accept and store donations. If they add them to a collection that also involves processing it to add to the online catalog plus adding labels, barcode, etc. If book ordering and processing is centralized that’s one more barrier to discourage adding donated books to a collection.
  • Most donations are gross: Even if your books are pristine, most aren’t. A lot of people are very precious about books and use donating to libraries as a way to get rid of books they don’t want to throw out. Meaning libraries get out-of-date, beat-up materials they can’t use.
  • Nothing lasts forever. Including books: A healthy and functional library system routinely weeds for condition, low circulation, and other issues. You don’t want a library that will keep everything you give them. It speaks to a lack of attention to community needs/interests.
  • Librarians can’t be precious about books. You want them to have that so -called thick skin because it means they are paying attention to what the library community wants and needs on shelves.
  • Books are the least of what libraries have to offer the public. Before you spend all of your concern on the books, remember all the other services libraries offer and all of the support library workers provide your community.
  • Libraries are very worried about protecting patrons AND staff from exposure to Covid-19. Part of that is limited services. Part of it might also include no longer accepting donations.

Wherever You Donate Books:

  • Wherever you donate, especially if you plan on donating in bulk: ASK FIRST
  • There might be specific requirements for donations and specific times in which donations are accepted.
  • Even if they accepted donations in the past, things change and you don’t want to take a trip for nothing.
  • Do NOT leave donations after being told they will not be accepted.

Donated Books Should Be:

  • Pristine: no tears, no writing or highlighting, no mold/foxing, dust jackets if applicable, no ex-library copies. If you wouldn’t buy it at a book sale, don’t donate it.
  • Recent: If you are donating non-fiction it should have been published within the last five years. Older than that runs the risk of spreading out of date information.
  • No textbooks: These are usually too specialized for public libraries and even for academic libraries are probably out of date.
  • No encyclopedias: They’re out of date. Don’t do it.
  • No periodicals: Do not bring your old magazines to the library. After you read them their next step in life should be the recycling bin.

When You Donate:

  • Donating a book does not mean it will enter the collection. Your books might instead be sold in a library book sale (another costly process for the library to put together), given away at programs, or recycled by the library themselves.
  • Remember, once you donate a book, you’re done with it. Which is to say you will not be able to control what happens next. Some will be used and read. Some will be sold.
  • Many donated books will be recycled. This is the natural cycle of a book (really). The good thing about donating is, even if they end up being recycled, it will be done properly because the donation site probably has a relationship with a book recycling facility.

Your Library Doesn’t Take Donations. Now What?

Before we talk about donation options, I also want to be clear: “readable” is not the same as “donatable.” Any books you donate should be pristine—new or very good condition with dust jackets if applicable. For non-fiction this also means recent. Older than 5 years? Recycle it.

Remember: ALWAYS ASK before donating books.

You can try contacting the places below:

  • Local Schools/Teachers (when books are age appropriate): With very few exceptions your books will not end up in a school library, but they might be useful for a teacher’s classroom library.
  • Local Hospitals: Many hospitals have waiting rooms or other sites with books. Be prepared for them to have restrictions on what they can accept and when, especially with the pandemic.
  • Thrift Stores/Used Bookstores: You might find a store that will buy books from you. They will pay a fraction of retail. You might also find stores that will accept donations to resell.
    • If you are in NYC you can look into selling your books to the Strand: https://www.strandbooks.com/sellyourbooks (you won’t know what they will or won’t accept until you are there with the books)
    • Powell’s has an online selling tool where you can enter ISBNs to see price and manage shipping to them: http://www.powells.com/sell-books
    • SellBackYourBook.com buys a variety of titles. You can enter ISBNs online or scan with their app. Prices aren’t phenomenal (if selling in bulk, the average price will be $1-2) but they offer free shipping and give the option to return or recycle anything they don’t accept. Note that they only accept 1 copy of each ISBN per household so don’t attempt to resell multiple copies of the same title.
  • Local Shelters
  • Retirement Centers and Nursing Homes: Many people chimed in with this suggestion. They might only accept specific formats or types of books so be sure to check before trying to drop something off.
  • Local Literacy Programs
  • After School/Daycare Programs (when age appropriate)
  • Armed Forces Charities: There are many organizations that get books into the hands of members of the armed forces. You can get details on where to start at Books for Soldiers and Operation Paperback.
  • Prison Libraries: Many prison libraries are also desperate for materials. They are a great place to donate but will have restrictions on the types of books they can accept (this could be both for content and format).
    You can find Books to Prisoners programs here:
    https://prisonbookprogram.org/prisonbooknetwork/
    For more comprehensive information on donating to prison libraries–including contacts for NY-centric donations–check out this flyer from PLSN (Prison Library Support Network): https://plsn-nyc.tumblr.com/donate

What Else Can You Do With Books You Want to Donate?

If you don’t have any luck with any of the above you can also:

  • Add your books to a little free library (or create one)
  • Give books to Brooklyn Book Bodega: According to their website “Brooklyn Book Bodega increases the number of 100+ book homes in Brooklyn. Research shows that households with 100+ books boost life outcomes for children and adolescents. ” They work with several sites to accept donations. As always, check that donation sites are accepting first and only donate books in great condition.
  • Ask at local laundromats
  • Set up book swaps in your community (following safety protocols)
  • Post them on Paperback Swap: This is a trading site where you can post individual books for trade. They also run periodic campaigns accepting donations for schools and the military.
  • Use books for altered book crafts including folded book sculptures, collage, using pages for origami, etc. You can find some book art tutorials in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaCIIkaCEX4

Other Ways to Support Your Library:

Libraries are so much more than books. The best ways to support your local library (and your library’s workers) are to use it, to give cash donations, and to advocate for the library with your elected officials.

Book Donation Infographic made by Emma Carbone

Top Ten Tuesday: Books With Funny Titles

Today’s prompt is books with funny titles. Click any of the titles below to read my review too.

  1. Nice Try, Jane Sinner by Liane Oelke
  2. Rayne and Delilah’s Midnite Matinee by Jeff Zentner
  3. The Way You Make Me Feel by Maurene Goo (admittedly this might be funny because I always want to sing it)
  4. The Left-Handed Booksellers of London by Garth Nix
  5. You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson
  6. Past Perfect by Leila Sales
  7. Wicked As You Wish by Rin Chupeco
  8. Tweet Cute by Emma Lord

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

Top Ten Tuesday: Spring To Read List

In experimenting with different things on the blog, I thought I’d come back to Top Ten Tuesdays. Looks like my last one (five years ago) was also a spring TBR so this seems fitting.

Anyway, here are some of the books I’m hoping to get to–are any of them on your radar?

  1. Amber & Clay by Laura Amy Schlitz
  2. The Bone Maker by Sarah Beth Durst
  3. Namesake by Adrienne Young
  4. A Psalm for the Wild Built by Becky Chambers
  5. Don’t Hate the Player by Alexis Nedd
  6. Broken Web by Lori M. Lee
  7. Lucky Girl by Jamie Pacton
  8. Somewhere Between Bitter and Sweet by Laekan Zee Kemp
  9. 10 Truths and a Dare by Ashley Elston
  10. Hani and Ishu’s Guide to Fake Dating by Adiba Jaigirdar

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

Week in Review: March 6: In which

missprintweekreview

Blog Posts of The Week:

Tweet of the Week:

https://twitter.com/miss_print/status/1367263365060587520

Instagram Post of the Week:

https://www.instagram.com/p/CL2BOWig68V/

How My Week Went:

Lots of errand-y things this week that were hard but it’s such a relief to have them done. Trying to be gentle with myself and not take on too much. You should too.