Miss Print’s Re-Prints: September 2007 Edition, Vol. 2

missprintreprintMiss Print’s Re-Prints is a weekly feature that will post on Saturday. Each week I’ll highlight reviews I wrote during a previous month in this blog’s run.

Currently I am Re-Printing 2007 posts.

September 2007: Volume 2

  • An Abundance of Katherines coverSeptember 8, 2007: An Abundance of Katherines by John Green–“The tone throughout is quirky, nerdy, and generally fun. I don’t know that reading this novel will change any lives, but it will certainly get a lot of laughs.”

 

 

 

  • The  Rumpelstiltskin Problem coverSeptember 10, 2007: The Rumpelstiltskin Problem by Vivian Vande Velde–“The book features six stories.  Questions answered include: Why would Rumpelstiltskin spin gold in exchange for less gold? Why would he want a baby? Why is the miller telling people his daughter can spin straw into gold? Why can’t anyone guess such a bizarre name? And more.” Vande Velde remains one of my favorite authors that no one else has heard of and these short stories are some of her best.

 

 

  • Nothing But the Truth (and a Few White Lies) coverSeptember 12, 2007: Nothing but the Truth (and a Few White Lies) by Justina Chen–“Chen writes with a style unlike any authors I’ve read recently. The narration is snappy and spunky–as is fitting for a teenage girl as vibrant as Patty. I also like that Headley doesn’t take the easy way a lot of the time. The story doesn’t follow any typical girl-meets-boy formula. In fact, Headley has quite a few twists thrown in along the way.

 

 

  • Eats, Shoots and Leaves coverSeptember 15, 2007: Eats, Shoots and Leaves by Lynn Truss-“At first I thought a zero tolerance approach to punctuation sounded a bit extreme. That is until Truss mentioned one of my favorite movies (“Two Weeks Notice”), pointing out that the title should be “Two Weeks Notice”. I was shocked. I had always assumed an apostrophe was there. Then I started listening to The Plain White T’s, a band whose name makes no sense with an apostrophe, and I knew things were getting serious.” I remember being very into this book when I read the copy my editor aunt sent me. Now, in all honesty, I’m not entirely sure why.

 

Check back next week for volume 3!

 

Miss Print’s Re-Prints: September 2007 Edition, Vol. 1

missprintreprintMiss Print’s Re-Prints is a weekly feature that will post on Saturday. Each week I’ll highlight reviews I wrote during a previous month in this blog’s run.

Currently I am Re-Printing 2007 posts.

September 2007: Volume 1
(also known as the month I apparently had no idea what post scheduling meant and posted multiple times per day . . . . what?)

  • War for the Oaks coverSeptember 2, 2007: War for the Oaks by Emma Bull–“There is something kind of awesome about a book that can combine rock music with something as fantastical as faeries. Bull does it wonderfully. Each chapter title is a song. Music excerpts abound throughout . . . ” (I always forget how much I like this book!)

 

 

  • A Mango-Shaped Space coverSeptember 3, 2007: A Mango-Shaped Space by Wendy Mass–“At the end of the day, more than being about dealing with a disability (I’m not even sure I like calling synesthesia a disability) A Mango-Shaped Space is about accepting who you are and coping with the harder parts of life.”

 

 

 

  • Peeps coverSeptember 3, 2007: Peeps by Scott Westerfeld–“Let me also say that you will never look at rats, or cats, the same way after reading this novel. There is something about a cat with a vampiric parasite that is just so much more appealing than a normal one.”

 

 

 

  • Cures for Heartbreak by Margo RabbSeptember 5, 2007: Cures for Heartbreak by Margo Rabb–“Rabb’s simple language and conversational tone make the story and characters come alive on the page. Mia’s loss is palpable throughout her narration.” (I like to think of this book as TFIOS before anyone cared who John Green was.)

 

 

 

 

Miss Print’s Re-Prints: August 2007 Edition

missprintreprintMiss Print’s Re-Prints is a weekly feature that will post on Saturday. Each week I’ll highlight reviews I wrote during a previous month in this blog’s run.

Currently I am Re-Printing 2007 posts.

August 2007

  • August 12, 2007: I started this blog with a post saying “Howdy” (I almost never say howdy anymore.) This blog started when I knew I’d be applying to grad school for library science after college and that I wanted to have a bit of a writing sample built up with book reviews when I applied in 2008. Since then I’ve come to consider this blog one of my favorite things and also one of my biggest assets on my resume.
  • The Meq coverAugust 12, 2007: The Meq by Steve Cash: “And, at the risk of gushing, the word “awesome” really doesn’t do this book justice.” I have to say I still haven’t finished this series, and it’s possible I never will, BUT if you like sweeping historical fantasy sagas it doesn’t get much better than this one.

 

 

 

  • The Hoboken Chicken Emergency coverAugust 14, 2007: The Hoboken Chicken Emergency by Daniel Pinkwater. I really liked “the message of the story, which overtly is that “Chickens need love too” but is also just a call for tolerance–something that can never be stated enough.”

 

 

 

  • Love, Stargirl coverAugust 21, 2007: I reviewed Love, Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli. This is still one of my most favorite books and I remember the exact moment when I realized this sequel was rocking my world. “If you aren’t touched by Stargirl and her little kindnesses and the beauty of this book, then you are beyond all help.

 

 

  • The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian coverAugust 27, 2007: The Absolutely True Diart of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie: “At times Alexie’s descriptions of white-Indian relations and life on the rez are so scathing that they’re painful to read. And yet . . . I couldn’t put the book down.” Shortly after reading this one I decided to read all of Alexie’s published works. I made it to Ten Little Indians before I realized I was burnt out. I haven’t picked up one of his books since. I keep thinking it might be time for a re-read of Reservation Blues but then I keep putting it off.

 

  • Fly on the Wall coverAugust 29, 2007: This was a big day for the blog. I reviewed Fly on the Wall by E. Lockhart as my first Chick Lit Wednesday post. At the time I didn’t know I was starting a commentary on feminism in books. I didn’t know I was going to try to reclaim the term “chick lit” from all of its negative connotations. But this post is where all of those sparks started. (I also updated this post in 2009 when I was taking a YA Lit class to make it into an awesome book talk–to date one of my favorites and maybe one of my best.) “Even though you think the book is about a girl turning into a fly which is a fair assumption, it’s really about more than that too. Specifically, it’s about a girl learning to go after what she wants.