BookExpo 2019: The Books

This is a post tracking the books I got each day at BEA and what happened to them because such things interest me. You can also read my more eventful BEA recap in a separate post.

Not shown here: I work in a library and have a lot of blogger friends so I got some books knowing they’d immediately be passed on.

  • Green = Books I read and plan to keep
  • Blue = Books I read and then passed on
  • Red = Books I gave away without reading

Day One

  1. Moonstruck by Grace Ellis & Shae Beagle
  2. The Scarecrow by Beth Ferry, Terry Fan, Eric Fan
  3. Deadly Class: Reagan Youth by Rick Remender, Wes Craig
  4. Take The Mic edited by Bethany C. Morrow
  5. MoonCakes by Suzanne Walker & Wendy Xu
  6. Serpent & Dove by Shelby Mahurin
  7. Guts by Raina Telgemeier
  8. Caster by Elsie Chapman
  9. Scavenge The Stars by Tara Sim
  10. The Tea Dragon Festival by Katie O’Neill
  11. Far From Agrabah by Aisha Saeed
  12. Tarnished Are the Stars by Rosiee Thor

And samplers of: Rebel by by Marie Lu; Pumpkinheads by Rainbow Rowell and Faith Erin Hicks; Practically Ever After by Isabel Bandeira, Call Down the Hawk by Maggie Steifvater

Day Two

  1. Spencer’s New Pet by Jessie Sima
  2. Butterfly Yellow by Thanhha Lai
  3. The Last True Poets of the Sea by Julia Drake
  4. The Revolution of Birdie Randolph by Brandy Colbert
  5. Frankly in Love by David Yoon
  6. The Grace Year by Kim Liggett
  7. Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass by Lilah Sturges, et al
  8. Pandora’s Legacy by Kara Leopard, Kelly Matthews, Nichole Matthews
  9. Some Places More Than Others by Renée Watson
  10. The Okay Witch by Emma Steinkellner
  11. Stargazing by Jen Wang
  12. Making Friends: Back to the Drawing Board by Kristen Gudsnuk
  13. I Hope You Get This Message by Farah Rishi
  14. The Good Luck Girls by Charlotte Davis
  15. No Ivy League by Hazel Newlevant
  16. The Gravity of Us by Phil Stamper
  17. The Map From Here to There by Emery Lord
  18. Permanent Record by Mary H. K. Choi

Day Three

  1. Angel Mage by Garth Nix
  2. 10 Blind Dates by Ashley Elston
  3. Stormrise by Jillian Boehme
  4. Sparrow by Mary Cecelia Jackson
  5. The Infinite Noise by Lauren Shippen
  6. A Thousand Fires by Shannon Price
  7. Lifestyles of Gods and Monsters by Emily Roberson
  8. Symptoms of a Heartbreak by Sona Charaipotra
  9. The Tenth Girl by Sara Faring
  10. There Will Come a Darkness by Katy Rose Pool

And samplers of: Rebel by Marie Lu, Supernova by Marissa Meyer, and a very special exclusive in a manila folder.

Read and Keep:

  1. The Scarecrow by Beth Ferry, Terry Fan, Eric Fan
  2. Spencer’s New Pet by Jessie Sima
  3. Butterfly Yellow by Thanhha Lai
  4. The Okay Witch by Emma Steinkellner
  5. Making Friends: Back to the Drawing Board by Kristen Gudsnuk
  6. The Map From Here to There by Emery Lord
  7. Angel Mage by Garth Nix
  8. 10 Blind Dates by Ashley Elston

Read and Pass On:

  1. Moonstruck by Grace Ellis & Shae Beagle
  2. Deadly Class: Reagan Youth by Rick Remender, Wes Craig
  3. MoonCakes by Suzanne Walker & Wendy Xu
  4. Serpent & Dove by Shelby Mahurin
  5. Caster by Elsie Chapman
  6. The Tea Dragon Festival by Katie O’Neill
  7. The Last True Poets of the Sea by Julia Drake
  8. The Revolution of Birdie Randolph by Brandy Colbert
  9. Frankly in Love by David Yoon
  10. The Grace Year by Kim Liggett
  11. Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass by Lilah Sturges, et al
  12. Pandora’s Legacy by Kara Leopard, Kelly Matthews, Nichole Matthews
  13. Stargazing by Jen Wang
  14. The Good Luck Girls by Charlotte Davis
  15. No Ivy League by Hazel Newlevant
  16. Permanent Record by Mary H. K. Choi
  17. Symptoms of a Heartbreak by Sona Charaipotra
  18. There Will Come a Darkness by Katy Rose Pool

Gave Away Unread:

  1. Take The Mic edited by Bethany C. Morrow
  2. Guts by Raina Telgemeier
  3. Scavenge The Stars by Tara Sim
  4. Far From Agrabah by Aisha Saeed
  5. Tarnished Are the Stars by Rosiee Thor
  6. Some Places More Than Others by Renée Watson
  7. I Hope You Get This Message by Farah Rishi
  8. The Gravity of Us by Phil Stamper
  9. Stormrise by Jillian Boehme
  10. Sparrow by Mary Cecelia Jackson
  11. The Infinite Noise by Lauren Shippen
  12. A Thousand Fires by Shannon Price
  13. Lifestyles of Gods and Monsters by Emily Roberson
  14. The Tenth Girl by Sara Faring

Totals:

  • Total books: 40
  • Read and Keep: 8
  • Read and Give Away: 18
  • Give Away Unread: 14

BookExpo 2019: The Recap

Here is my very belated recap of BookExpo 2019. I was lucky enough to be involved with the YA Editors’ Buzz Panel again this year as part of the selection committee that chose the five featured titles and was approved for press registration again this year.

The show’s format was a little different with the exhibit floor open for three days and signings, panels, and other events happening on all three days.

Let me say up front that I got to see so many friends this year. I have never felt so popular or had so much fun at a convention. As usual, Nicole and I were BookExpo buddies and as is becoming tradition we had quite the adventure figuring out how to pick up our press badges.

Wednesday was very low key with a later start. It was a good way to ease into the convention, figure out registration, find friends, and explore the show floor.Also there was a giant Christmas tree for The Crayons’ Christmas by Drew Daywalt and Oliver Jeffers. Please enjoy this preview of my new Christmas card:

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BookExpo 2018 Recap Day Two: Books, Pics, and Everything I Did

You can also check out my full recap of day one!

Day Two

On day two, Nicole and I thought we could plan to leave later than the day before since were already registered. But then I panicked and we wound up leaving early still which was a good call because it was raining and took a while to get a cab to the Javits Center. Then when we arrived we found our usual coat check was full and had to detour to a different floor to drop off our bags. But of course we still had time to mill around waiting for the show floor to open.

Look at this fun banner that was there for Kevin Henkes upcoming picture book:

Look elephants! banner at BookExpo 2018I also was able to take a start-of-day selfie with a new dress that I’m obsessed with.

(I also posted this selfie to Twitter with the tag which was a little embarrassing later when I was waiting on a line and people saw it as one of the latest tweets in the BookExpo hashtag. Oops!)

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BookExpo 2018 Recap Day One: Books, Pics, and Everything I Did

This year Nicole and I were both approved to attend BookExpo as Press and I have to admit it felt like order was restored. I decided to keep things simple this year and had very few big priorities. With the event being two days (without any added things) it was also lower key that it had been in a while.

Day One

Nicole and I started the day with a very circuitous hunt for registration to pick up our badges (this also included both of us accidentally ending up in the International Franchise Expo registration line but we quickly realized our mistake).

With badges in hand, it was time to do some waiting for the show floor to open.

I started the day with a selfie. As one does.

This was also the debut of my shorter hair cut after a failed attempt to grow it out this winter. I cannot tell you how happy I am to have short hair again!

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BookExpo and SLJ Day of Dialog 2017 Recap: All the books, some of the pics, GIVEAWAYS

BookExpo was held earlier this month. After a bit of waffling, I wound up going again this year with Nicole. I was lucky enough to be involved with selecting the books for the 2017 Young Adult BookExpo Editors’ Buzz Panel and was thrilled to receive a Speaker badge and have the chance to see the panel in person. (I also received a Press badge but only heard about it several hours into the show but that’s another story.)

BookExpo itself was scaled back a lot this year with the event happening across two days instead of three and generally a more laid back feeling.

The day before I got to attend School Library Journal’s Day of Dialog which was a fun day of panels and conversations about upcoming titles and publishing trends. I got to hang out with Stacy, a librarian friend I met through Twitter, listen to publishing pitches about Fall 2017 children’s and YA titles.

SLJ DoD also had amazing keynotes from Gene Luen Yang (talking about being a nerd, finding his people, and his Read Without Walls challenge); Megan Whalen Turner talked about the process behind making the maps for Thick as Thieves and the new paperback reissues of the rest of her series; Kwame Alexander closed the day with a keynote about his upcoming title Solo. The day ended with Roger Sutton and Kwame Alexander announcing the winners of the Boston Globe-Horn Book Prize and I’m still thrilled that Vincent and Theo by Deborah Heiligman took home the non-fiction prize! If you want to see some of my live tweets from the Day of Dialog you can find them on twitter.

While I tried to frame my week-long vacation to have down time before and after BookExpo, it was a lot to head to Javits immediately after Day of Dialog. Still, Nicole and I were ready bright and early.

For the first time I also got the point of free buttons–they look great on badge lanyards!

Day One was pretty chill with Nicole and I catching the YA Editors’ Buzz panel along with a few signings.We also got to meet up with Cecelia and Sajda for a lot of the day but because it’s me, I mostly forgot to take pictures.

I was very happy to catch Gabrielle Zevin who regular readers will know is one of my absolute favorite authors and a generally delightful person.

The afternoon saw signings with Megan Whalen Turner (which OMG still can’t believe it), Lynn Weingarten (I love seeing Lynn at real life events–definitely as fun as talking on Twitter!), and Charlie Jane Anders (who is easily the most enthusiastic author I’ve ever met and loved my Ruth Bader Ginsburg pin).

There was also a fair bit of waiting in lines for some “big” signings.

Jane, Unlimited has become a really important book for me–I’m not totally sure why since I’m not a Graceling superfan but it was very high priority to see her and, happily after a long wait in line, it all worked out! After that and a crazy line for E. Lockhart, Nicole and I decided to call it quits and haul our books and ourselves out of the Javits.

Day two started with exploring the floor and visiting Macmillan’s Grishaverse booth which had a photobooth, buttons, and samplers from Leigh Bardugo’s forthcoming The Language of Thorns.

I am all about these buttons which are matte and colorful and (for mine at least) say Queen and Witch.

Nicole and I also got to take some photos and even got this super cool gif version!

After exploring the floor for a bit, it was time for a crazy line for Marie Lu’s signing of Warcross.

The line was long but fast and I’m excited to dive into this sci-fi adventure soon!

Excitingly Isabel Bandeira was signing Dramatically Ever After in the afternoon. I love talking to Issy on Twitter and so enjoyed her debut Bookishly Ever After and interviewing her about it so it was amazing to get to see her again!

After that most of the afternoon was spent scoping out the kind of intense line for Holly Black’s signing and just wandering around the floor. I was skeptical of the Owlcrate booth but it wound up being really fun with a wheel to win different items, buttons, stickers, and cute tote bags.

I usually don’t do pictures with authors because it takes up time and I generally would prefer to use the time to talk to the authors. BUT I made an exception for Holly Black because, well, it’s Holly.

After that Nicole and I were fried so we headed home to have an early dinner with my mom before heading out for Macmillan’s publicist party.

Macmillan’s Fierce Reads party is an annual thing where bloggers get to mix and mingle, meet Macmillan’s wonderful publicity team, and chat with several authors. I am not the best at cold mingling (I need time to warm up) but I did get to meet Anna-Marie McLemore in person after tweeting her a few times. She is as lovely and mermaid-like in person as you’d expect. It was also great to catch up with Gina Gagliano–the excellent publicist for First Second Books.

My favorite moment of the night was definitely meeting Emmy Laybourne. Berserker already sounded like it was right up my alley but after talking to Emmy I’m even more excited to read it. Nicole and I also got to talk to Kami Garcia for a fair chunk of the party which made me think I have to give The Lovely Reckless a try soon!

Nicole, Cecelia, Sajda and I also finally remembered to take a picture together before the end of the night!

And with that BookExpo 2017 came to an end.

I’ll also leave you with some shots of all of the books I got from BookExpo!

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Pretty stoked about these ARCs and samplers from @fiercereads' BookExpo party! After chatting with Emmy Laybourne about Berserker it is at the top of my to read list. Also included: samplers of Renegades by Marissa Meyer, The Language of Thorns, Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi; Moxie by Jen Matthieu; You Bring the Distant Near by Mitali Perkins, Wild Beauty by Anna-Marie McLemore. Also: nail polish for The Lovely Reckless by Kami Garcia. The tote is so much fun it gets its own picture. I have to research permanent fabric markers and buy some to get it signed by some authors. #bookstagram #goodreads #instabook #instareads #bibliophile #books #reading #currentlyreading #amreading #bookworm #bookish #bookgram #booktography #bookblogging #bookblogger #bookphotography #books #bookexpo2017 #bookexpoamerica #bookexpo #moxiegirlsfightback #wildbeauty #youbringthedistantnear #berserker #renegades #childrenofbloodandbone #thelanguageofthorns #grishaverse #thelovelyreckless

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I’m also sharing the BookExpo wealth with some giveaways!

On Twitter:

On Instagram:

 

Event Recap and Reflections: Victoria Schwab Signing This Savage Song

Last week I went to Victoria Schwab’s signing on July 7 for This Savage Song at Books of Wonder. This book was the only ARC I asked my BFF Nicole to try to get for me when she went to ALA Midwinter a few months ago. I added the event to my phone calendar almost as soon as it was announced and adjusted my work schedule to be sure I could be there early. I went alone because no friends could accompany me and it was that important for me to be there.

It was a great event. Victoria talked about how the main characters of this book, Kate and August, both explore different sides of anxiety. She mentioned that a theme she returns to often in her stories is an exploration of what it means to not feel comfortable in your own skin. She also explained that August’s voice came to her very early on in the writing process while Kate remained much more reticent–forcing the entire story to shift into third person so that Victoria could tell both characters’ stories throughout the novel. It’s a common pattern in her novels having tough, non-talkative female characters contrasted with more emotive male characters.

During the Q&A, Victoria imagined that her characters Delilah Bard and Victor Vale would be the most interesting ones to see locked in a room together. She guessed that neither of them would talk but that by the time they were released they would have a grudging respect for each other. Victoria discussed how she explores archetypes in many of her books but always strives to create something new (witches in The Near Witch, monsters in her latest novel and so on) and how her degree in the portrayal of monsters factored into her writing This Savage Song. (Spoiler: The way monsters are perceived has everything to do with humans and not always a lot to do with the monsters.)

During the course of her career (eleven books so far) she has realized that every character she writes represents one aspect of herself whether it’s something she strives for (Delilah Bard) or something closer to her reality (Victor Vale or Holland–jokingly). She also talked a bit about organizing her owned books by color and how she isn’t a re-reader which, as someone else who doesn’t re-read, I loved. She explained how her calendar method of tracking progress on various projects helps her to be a consistent writer even if she is not a fast writer. (I adore this idea and use star stickers and a monthly calendar to track my blog and work stuff–working on adding writing back into my routine too.)

I try to attend Victoria’s signings whenever she’s in New York (just about a year ago I was at McNally Jackson buying a red-endpapers copy of A Darker Shade of Magic) and this one obviously didn’t disappoint. At the end of the night I returned my newly signed copies of This Savage Song and A Gathering of Shadows to their spots on my bookshelf.

victoriaschwabbooksAfter staring at my books I started thinking about a lot of things (like how lucky I am to be in New York where so many author events happen). This signing was an interesting full circle moment for me.

Four years ago, in 2012, I worked at Books of Wonder for eight months. It felt like my library degree was a mistake and although I desperately missed librarian work, I had begun to wonder if it was ever going to happen for me as an actual career. Last week, while I waited for my number (61) to be called I considered that point in my life where earning more than minimum wage seemed like a pipe dream compared to now when I just marked my second anniversary as a full-time librarian in June.

Five years ago, in 2011, I discovered Victoria Schwab’s debut novel The Near Witch at a signing at Books of Wonder. I had just started attending book signings as I became more aware of the book community in New York through a combination of blogging, getting review books through Amazon Vine, and being in library school. I was at the signing for a different author but gave myself permission to buy one book. After much agonizing, I picked up The Near Witch. I read the book soon after and reviewed it on here, as I’m wont to do.

A few months later I met Terra McVoy at another signing (at Books of Wonder) and she offered to participate in a blog interview. And honestly, that changed my life. Because of that meeting with Terra, I began reaching out to other authors, including Victoria Schwab to talk about The Near Witch.

The rest is history.

Of course I snapped up The Archived and The Unbound. How could I not when I was a librarian and these books featured a library where the dead rest on shelves like books? Vicious became a point of pride book to get at BEA 2013 and a favorite read that I think still find myself thinking about to this day. And I can’t even tell you how often I’ve been recommending A Darker Shade of Magic (which I was lucky enough to read just before its release thanks to a very generous librarian who saw my tweets asking for ALA attendees who got an ARC to think of me). When I received an ARC of A Gathering of Shadows after requesting it from the publisher, I really felt like I had arrived as a blogger. Then, of course, there’s This Savage Song which might be my favorite Victoria Schwab book to date of the ones I have read.

Victoria talked about her “overnight” success on Tumblr last week. Specifically, about how framing her career that way isn’t the most accurate portrayal. Reading that post, seeing Victoria at a signing and knowing we are solid acquaintances now thanks to Twitter, and admiring my own books on their shelf, I realized what a privilege it is to follow an author  from their beginnings. It’s crazy to think about who I was when I attended that small panel signing where I bought my copy of The Near Witch compared to who I am this month when I was 61st in line for Victoria to sign copies of her eleventh book.

I am so grateful to be where I am and, silly as it is, a bit humbled when I think about how many opportunities I have found and received surrounding Victoria’s books (and so many other books that I  have discovered because I started blogging and going to book signings).

BEA 2016: The Recap

BEA was in Chicago this year and for a very long time, I had no plans of going. I knew the added costs of travel (not to mention room and board) were going to be hard to manage. But as we got closer (still months away, mind) Nicole said that she wanted to go and after talking with my mom I decided I could make it work.

Fast forward through months of selling odds and ends on eBay to fund my flights and room, obsessively checking Chicago weather to figure out what to pack, and lots of other preparations for the trip that I did not expect having not traveled to BEA before (since it’s been in NYC every other year I went) and not traveled in general on this scale in at least ten years.

DAY ONE

Nicole and I knew we wanted to get in some sightseeing in Chicago since we’d never been so we booked an early flight on Tuesday (the day before BEA).

Upon arriving in Chicago we took the world’s longest cab ride to our hotel which was a bit dated but still pleasant enough for our trip. It was also swank as hell from the outside.

After checking in at the hotel and stowing our luggage until a room would be ready, we headed to the best breakfast place in the entire world: Yolk. Yolk was conveniently in walking distance to the hotel and became a favorite spot during our short trip.

Because I was an art history minor in college and love museums, I lobbied heavily for a visit to the Art Institute Chicago next.

I made sure we saw the Thorne Miniature rooms.

Nicole discovered the Art Institute Chicago’s Paperweight collection.

Then we both started to lose steam and decided to head to the gift shop. (Got to get those souvenirs!) This stop proved extremely helpful because I realized it was important to check out some other iconic pieces of art before we left.

After that, it was time to head back to the hotel. We decided to walk along Michigan Avenue to check out some other souvenir shops and window shop back to the hotel.

After regrouping at the hotel Nicole and I headed out to get dinner (dollar burgers at Bar Louie) and explore. I think because we were in a touristy area and near Columbia College Chicago, there was a lot of green space near the hotel and lots of public art in the form of sculptures and murals. So, just walking along Michigan Avenue it was possible to see a lot of beautiful things.

And with that day one in Chicago came to a close.

DAY TWO

It turns out when you travel one time zone over you body never really adjusts to being an hour ahead and you end up being awake really early for no good reason. So although BEA did not officially start until the afternoon, our day started early.

Happily, there were pancakes involved.

Then it was basically time to head to McCormick Place where we discovered that some things are the same in any city (AKA pre-BEA crowds).

BUT all of this line waiting did give me a chance to catch up with Cecelia and Sajda (and make dinner plans with Cecelia–more on that later) and also to meet Christina. Finally! So exciting. As is my way, I forgot to take pictures with almost everyone. So it goes.

Luckily Cecelia was a bit more on point so I at least have this:

The first day of BEA was pretty chill. There were some lines.

There were signings. And, most importantly, there was the new Little Elliot book Little Elliot, Big Fun.

Because so much of the show was scaled back this year, Nicole and I actually got to leave at a reasonable time. So we headed back to the hotel, emptied our suitcase, and got ready for dinner.

I had been asking about places to eat in Chicago for months by this point and one that stuck out was Portillo’s. As soon as Carli told me there were cake milkshakes, I was sold. So I dragged along Nicole, Cecelia and Cecelia’s friend Liza.

Words and even pictures cannot do justice to the sensory overload that is Portillo’s.

It was insane but I think it was also a sort of rite of passage as a Chicago visitor. The cake milkshake was exactly what you would expect of a piece of chocolate cake being put through a blender. I can still taste the icing.

DAY THREE

This was the first full day at BEA and the busiest.

There were tickets to be had.

There were signs to be held.

(I didn’t get that book, incidentally, but holding the sign seemed important.)

There were friends to meet like Val and Shannon and Kristen. There were friends to see like Britt and Cecelia and Sajda. Nicole and I spent a good chunk of BEA hanging out with Sajda and Cecelia which turned out to be an excellent life choice.

There were lots of exciting books!

One of my goals going into BEA this year was to be more selective about books and also to hit up some of the “less big” publishers. Mission accomplished because Sourcebooks was on point this year!

I didn’t take a photo with Zoraida Cordova BUT she did like my nails and had some epic candy swag.

After a full day at the convention center, Nicole and I decided it was high time to see the Bean. I don’t think either of us expected it to be as amazing as it was. But we had a blast!

So many photos ensued.

Like this isn’t even all of the photos yet. I’m still working through sharing them all on Twitter or Instagram. Anyway, it was a blast.

After that it was an easy walk to Giordano’s for their infamous deep dish pizza. The only problem is making the actual pizza took forever so our night wound up being quite long for what, I’m just going to say it, was a fairly horrible pizza experience. It turns out deep dish pizza is only good when it is super hot. And even then the “goodness” is questionable. I will say that the bruschetta we ordered as a starter was delicious. Live and learn!

DAY FOUR

The final day of BEA started quite early. But we had a plan.

After realizing that Chicago BEA is a lot more chill that NYC BEA, Nicole and I decided to get tickets to Maggie Stiefvater’s signing for The Raven King. Because why not?

This involved getting to McCormick Place quite early, waiting in line, getting coffee, and then (finally) getting tickets before heading out to get breakfast. A mad dash back the convention center followed.

There were, unsurprisingly, a lot of lines on this final day of BEA.

My face, I think, sums up my feelings about said lines.

Things got really intense while Nicole and I were waiting for Kendare Blake’s signing. Every year there is one book at BEA that seems to be impossible to get. This year it was Three Dark Crowns. This signing involved waiting for over an hour, several book counts, and repeated warnings that we might not get books.

But, eventually it all worked out!

After finishing up at McCormick Place, Nicole and I had to figure out shipping our books. There was not going to be time to do anything in the morning and we discovered that the local post office hours did not work with our schedule.

But it turns out our hotel had numerous benefits (like a free shuttle to McCormick Place every day) including being across the street from a larger, swankier hotel with a Fedex Store in the lobby. There’s no way around it: shipping books is expensive and I don’t think either of us counted on the level of embarrassment in emptying an entire suitcase (plus two tote bags in my case) of books into a box. Not that we were alone–lots of people were queuing up to do the exact same thing as we left. But it all worked out and I felt a lot better about it than having to deal with BEA shipping.

The swankier hotel also had a gift shop where I found a necklace in a style I’d been searching for without success for the last year.

We closed out our last full day in Chicago with tacos from Flaco’s Tacos (delicious) and some quiet time in our room. And packing.

DAY FIVE

The final day in Chicago wasn’t really a day. It was just time for a nice breakfast (and a souvenir shirt from Yolk, of course), a long cab ride to the airport, and two hours waiting in the security line at the airport.

Once we were checked in for our flight, Nicole and I got some last minute edible souvenirs (popcorn and fancy chocolate) before waiting for the flight home. Then it was time for another long cab ride home.

And with that, BEA 2016 officially came to a close.

My books arrived the next week and at this point everything is squared away. Until next year.

Interested in every book I got at BEA? Check out my 2016 BEA Books Recap.

BEA 2016: The Books

This is a post tracking the books I got each day at BEA and what happened to them because such things interest me. You can also read my more eventful BEA recap in a separate post.

Not shown here: I work in a library and have a lot of blogger friends so I got some books knowing they’d immediately be passed on.

  • Green = Books I read and plan to keep
  • Blue = Books I read and then passed on
  • Red = Books I gave away without reading

Day One

  1. The Female of the Species by Linday Rebar
  2. Little Elliot, Big Fun by Mike Curato
  3. Unicorns Are Jerks (coloring book) by Theo Nicole Lorenz
  4. Kingdom of Ash and Briars by Hannah West
  5. The Scourge by Jennifer A. Nielsen
  6. The Forgetting by Sharon Cameron
  7. In Case You Missed It by Sarah Darer Littman
  8. Teach Me to Forget by Erica M. Chapman
  9. The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee
  10.  The Call by Peadar O’Guilin
  11. A Shadow Bright and Burning by Jessica Cluess
  12. The Graces by Laura Eve
  13. The Movie Version by Emma Wunsch
  14. The Lie Tree by Francis Hardinge
  15. Invincible Summer by Alice Adams

Day Two

  1. Once Upon an Alphabet by Oliver Jeffers
  2. Little Bot and Sparrow by Jake Parker
  3. Return by Aaron Becker
  4. The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles by Michelle Cuevas, illustrated by Erin E. Stead
  5. Caraval by Stephanie Garber
  6. Thieving Weasels by Billy Taylor
  7. Bookishly Ever After by Isabel Bandeira
  8. Spontaneous by Aaron Starmer
  9. Stalking Jack the Ripper by Kerri Maniscalco
  10. The Sudden Appearance of Hope by Claire North
  11. The Edge of Everything by Jeff Giles
  12. Our Chemical Hearts by Krystal Sutherland
  13. Warp by Lev Grossman
  14. The Great Shelby Holmes by Elizabeth Eulberg
  15. The Haters by Jesse Andrews
  16. The Romantics by Leah Konen
  17. Maresi by Maria Turtschaninoff
  18. Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Cordova
  19. Vassa in the Night by Sarah Porter
  20. The Diabolic by S. J. Kincaid
  21. It’s Not Me, It’s You by Stephanie Kate Strohm
  22. The Changelings by Christina Soontornvat
  23. The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett by Chelsea Sedoti

Day Three

  1. Seriously Wicked by Tina Connolly
  2. Frostblood by Elly Blake
  3. Spindle by E. K. Johnston
  4. Ghost Talkers by Mary Robinette Kowal
  5. Girl in Disguise by Greer Macallister
  6. The Geek Feminist Revolution by Kameron Hurley
  7. Last Seen Leaving by Caleb Roerhig
  8. The Raven King by Maggie Stiefvater
  9. Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake
  10. Tiny Pretty Things by Sona Charaipotra and Dhonielle Clayton
  11. The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
  12. Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier

Read and Keeping:

  1. Little Elliot, Big Fun by Mike Curato
  2. Once Upon an Alphabet by Oliver Jeffers
  3. Return by Aaron Becker
  4. The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles by Michelle Cuevas, illustrated by Erin E. Stead
  5. The Raven King by Maggie Stiefvater
  6. Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake
  7. Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Cordova
  8. Bookishly Ever After by Isabel Bandeira
  9. The Romantics by Leah Konen
  10. The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
  11. The Diabolic by S. J. Kincaid
  12. The Lie Tree by Francis Hardinge
  13. Caraval by Stephanie Garber

Read and Passing On:

  1. Unicorns Are Jerks (coloring book) by Theo Nicole Lorenz
  2. Little Bot and Sparrow by Jake Parker
  3. Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier
  4. The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee
  5. Vassa in the Night by Sarah Porter
  6. The Graces by Laura Eve
  7. Spontaneous by Aaron Starmer
  8. Teach Me to Forget by Erica M. Chapman
  9. The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett by Chelsea Sedoti
  10. Frostblood by Elly Blake
  11. Thieving Weasels by Billy Taylor
  12. It’s Not Me, It’s You by Stephanie Kate Strohm
  13. Last Seen Leaving by Caleb Roerhig

Giving Away Unread:
(These titles were put up for adoption to be read and reviewed by other bloggers.)

  1. Maresi by Maria Turtschaninoff
  2. The Changelings by Christina Soontornvat
  3. The Call by Peadar O’Guilin
  4. Our Chemical Hearts by Krystal Sutherland
  5. The Haters by Jesse Andrews
  6. The Scourge by Jennifer A. Nielsen
  7. The Movie Version by Emma Wunsch
  8. The Edge of Everything by Jeff Giles
  9. Warp by Lev Grossman
  10. The Great Shelby Holmes by Elizabeth Eulberg
  11. The Female of the Species by Linday Rebar
  12. In Case You Missed It by Sarah Darer Littman
  13. Invincible Summer by Alice Adams
  14. Stalking Jack the Ripper by Kerri Maniscalco

Totals:

  • Total books: 51
  • Read and Keep: 13
  • Read and Give Away: 13
  • Give Away Unread: 14

This post was inspired by something similar I saw Hannah create a couple of years ago. Basically, it confirms every suspicion that if you are going to BEA solely for the free books, it’s not worth it. It’s also interesting to me to see how “good” I am every year at picking up books I actually want. (The cost aspect is moot this year because I spent sooooo much more with it being in Chicago but also I got in a lot of sightseeing and fun so it balanced out.) You can also check out my 2015 BEA books post.

AAP Children’s Tri-State Book Buzz 2015: Event Recap Part 3

Last week I got to attend the American Association of Publisher’s Tri-State Book Buzz event. Book Buzz is an all-day event (at Random House HQ this year) where various publishers give brief presentations highlighting the new titles they will have in the upcoming publishing season (Spring 2016 in this case).

This is my attempt at a recap although there was SO much going on that I’m sure I’ll miss some good stuff. If you want to see what other people had to say about it on social media, you can check out the hashtag #BookBuzz2015 which attendees used to highlight the children’s/YA day (which I attended) as well as the adult one.

YOU CAN CHECK OUT PART ONE HERE!

YOU CAN CHECK OUT PART TWO HERE!

Macmillan:

  • Arctic White by Danna Smith, illustrated by Lee White (January 2016) is about a girl and her grandfather going to see the Northern Lights and it looks absolutely charming.
  • When Green Becomes Tomatoes: Poems for Every Season by Julie Fogliano, illustrated by Julie Morstad is a beautiful looking collection of seasonal poems.
  • Philip C. Stead returns with a new solo picture book called Ideas Are All Around (March 2016) with a combination of photos and illustrations that follows an author around his neighborhood as he looks for inspiration.
  • Where’s the Party? by Ruth Chan (April 2016) is picture book about a cat who loves to party. But where is the party?
  • Terror at Battle Creek by Watt Key (January 2016) is a middle grade novel that follows kids left behind in the chaos of evacuation during a category three hurricane.
  • Faith Erin Hicks has a new middle grad trilogy starting with The Nameless City (April 2016). The Nameless City is constantly being invaded and renamed but the residents know that no name will hold for long.
  • Underwater (January 2016) is Marie Reichardt’s YA debut that takes place in the aftermath of a tragic high school shooting as the main character grapples with survivor’s guilt and a father with PTSD.
  • Flawed by Cecelia Ahern (April 2016) is a YA debut being touted as Divergent meets The Scarlet Letter.

Sourcebooks:

  • A Year in the Life of a Complete and Total Genius by Stacey Matson (November 2015) is the start of a middle grade series about a boy coming to grips with the death of his mother. The ephemera format also promises that the book will appeal to reluctant readers.
  • The Night Parade by Kathryn Tanquary (January 2016) is being touted as Spirited Away meets A Christmas Carol. The story features a Japanese heroine, 3 nights, 3 guides and 3 chances to break the curse!
  • Just Like Me by Nancy J. Cavanaugh (April 2016) is a diverse story about a girl with two adopted Chinese sisters. It also has summer camp and shenanigans!
  • Until We Meet Again by Renee Collins (November 2015) is being called a time slip mystery with a dual POV. Color me excited.
  • The Greatest Zombie Movie Ever by Jeff Strand (March 2016) is filled with dark humor. The publicist presenting this title said it was like The Hangover but in high school and with a zombie movie. Despite the comparison the book is also a clean read.
  • Cori McCarthy’s latest You Were Here (March 2016) is an “emotionally cathartic page-turner.” The novel includes multiple POVs that follow traditional prose format, graphic novel format from character who is a selective mute and one told in art poetry.
  • Don’t Get Caught by Kurt Dinan (April 2016) is a debut about a prank club and characters seeking payback Ocean’s 11 style. Sure to have high reluctant reader appeal.
  • My Kind of Crazy by Robin Reul (April 2016) is another debut receiving comparisons to The Spectacular Now and Freaks & Geeks. It’s a friend story with promposal fail.

Chronicle Books:

  • Molly Idle returns with Flora and the Peacocks (May 2016) about the challenges of a three person friendship.
  • President Squid by Aaron Reynolds, illustrated by Sara Varon (March 2016) follows the exploits a squid who knows all of the ins and outs of becoming president. Ties, for instance, are VERY presidential!
  • Gena/Finn by Kat Helgeson and Hannah Moskowitz (April 2016) is a story about fan fiction, online friends and slash fic! All in an epistolary format!
  • Beth Kephart’s latest This is the Story of You (April 2016) is a mystery set in a town ravaged by a superstorm.

Soho Teen:

  • Barnabas Miller began writing his novel The Girl With the Wrong Name (November 2015) with the question “How would you tell yourself a story that you didn’t know you needed to tell yourself?”
  • I’m From Nowhere by Suzanne Myers (January 2016) is a companion to Stone Cove Island. It’s about a girl sent to boarding school by her single mother who has no clues about who her father is. It’s being pitched as a novel perfect for fans of subculture/chosen family novels like This Song Will Save Your Life.
  • It Wasn’t Always Like This by Joy Preble (May 2016) is Tuck Everlasting meets Veronica Mars and that, frankly, is all I needed to hear.
  • Little White Lies by Brianna Baker and F. Bowman Hastie III (February 2016) is a story of “millennial mayhem and magic” according to Rita Williams-Garcia. It’s also the story of how we construct identities online with alternate formatting besides.

Quirk Books:

  • Warren the 13th by Tania Del Rio, Wilhelm Staehle (November 2015) is a series starter that is ideal for fans of Coraline, Wes Anderson and Edward Gorey.
  • Quirk is also making a illustrated storybook of Home Alone just in time for the 25th anniversary. Watch for that this month!

Sterling Publishing:

  • Cici Reno #MiddleSchoolMatchmaker is Cyrano for the digital age.
  • In Mr. Particular even a complainer can save the day!
  • I Am NOT a Dinosaur is based on the AMNH collections and explains that not every pre-historic creature was a dinosaur.

Perseus Books:

  • Inherit the Stars by Tessa Elwood is being described as Game of Thrones. In space.
  • One of Us by Jeannie Waudby is a military suspense story about a girl who has to figure out who to trust and how to stay alive after being recruited by an insurgent spy organization.

Penguin Young Readers Group:

  • Ruta Septeys returns with a new historical fiction novel. In Salt to the Sea (February 2016) she explores the biggest maritime disaster in history (a German ship that sank during WWII) in this novel told from 4 POVs.
  • Where Futures End  by Parker Peeveyhouse (February 2016) is a debut sci-fi with 5 POVs. It’s being compared to one of my favorite novels of all time, The Ghosts of Heaven by Marcus Sedgwick, which is all I needed to hear.
  • Rebel of the Sands by Alwyn Hamilton (March 2016) is being pitched as Arabian Nights meets Mockingjay. Also: Genies! In the wild west!
  • The Children of Rookskill Castle by Janet Fox (March 2016) asks readers an important question: “Would you rather be trapped in an old Scottish castle with a ghost or a Nazi spy?
  • Daniel Finds a Poem by Micha Archer (February 2016) is a debut picture book where a little boy asks different animals, “what is poetry?” with illustrations reminiscent of Ezra Jack Keats.
  • Marilyn Singer and Josee Masse deliver another reverso poem collaboration in Echo, Echo (February 2016) which looks at and retells Greek myths.
  • Hoot and Peep by Lita Judge (March 2016) is an owl story so of course I’m excited. Hoot is the older brother teaching his wise owl ways to little sister Peep in this bedtime story.
  • Ten Days A Mad Woman by Deborah Noyes (February 2016) is a new biography about Nellie Bly and how awesome she was.

Little, Brown:

  • In Are We There Yet? by Dan Santat (April 2016) time starts to go so slowly that it begins to go backwards on a long roadtrip.
  • Sherman Alexie makes his picture book debut in Thunder Boy Jr. illustrated by Yuyi Morales (May 2016) in which Little Thunder wants a new name and he and his father have to figure out what it should be. I wish I had some artwork to show you all because it looks absolutely stunning.
  • In The Sound of Silence by Katrina Goldsaito, illustrated by Julia Kuo (August 2016) a boy in Tokyo looks for the silence between sounds.
  • Peter Brown makes his middle grade debut in The Wild Robot (April 2016) in which a robot alien has to take care of a baby goose and soon becomes part of the natural world.
  • Matthew Quick has a new YA coming called Every Exquisite Thing (May 2016) where a girl befriends a reclusive author in this celebration of self.
  • Girl in the Blue Coat by Monica Hesse (April 2016) was blurbed by Elizabeth Wein. It’s a WWII/Holocaust story that explores the ways in which “we are all heroes and villains at the same time.”
  • Annabel Pitcher is back with Silence is Goldfish (May 2016) in which a girl finds out, through a blog post, that she was conceived via IVF with a sperm donor. Shocked by this news she stops speaking and goes looking for her biological father. I’m not sure if the book is even in print anymore but this one sounds a lot like Donor Boy to me.

AAP Children’s Tri-State Book Buzz 2015: Event Recap Part 2

Last week I got to attend the American Association of Publisher’s Tri-State Book Buzz event. Book Buzz is an all-day event (at Random House HQ this year) where various publishers give brief presentations highlighting the new titles they will have in the upcoming publishing season (Spring 2016 in this case).

This is my attempt at a recap although there was SO much going on that I’m sure I’ll miss some good stuff. If you want to see what other people had to say about it on social media, you can check out the hashtag #BookBuzz2015 which attendees used to highlight the children’s/YA day (which I attended) as well as the adult one.

YOU CAN CHECK OUT PART ONE HERE!

Bloomsbury Children’s Books:

  • I’ve been hearing nothing but amazingly good things about Be A Friend by Salina Yoon (January 2016) and I have to say I’ve never wanted a mime book more.
  • Mousquerade Ball (May 2016) is a rhyming counting tale from power duo Lori Mortenson and illustrator Betsy Lewin.
  • Blue in the Face: A Story of Risk, Rhyme, and Rebellion by Gerry Swallow (December 2015) is a story set in a world of fracture nursery rhymes. In this “hilarious and irreverant” tale the main character is a girl whose super power is throwing epic tantrums by holding her breath.
  • How to Capture an Invisible Cat by Paul Tobin (March 2016): Sometimes a genius needs to do something dumb to unwind. Like make his pet cat gigantic and invisible. Recommended for reluctant readers.
  • Carrie Jones makes her middle grade debut in Time Stoppers (May 2016) which is a start to what is being called a “whimsical and sweeping” trilogy.
  • When We Collided by Emery Lord (April 2016) needs no further introduction I am sure.
  • Burning by Danielle Rollins (April 2016) is a story about girls in a detention facility. This psychological thriller also has the BEST tagline: “Monsters are much more interesting than heroes.”
  • Printz winner Nick Lake is back with a “fresh high concept tale” set in New Jersey in Whisper to Me (May 2016) which is a summer romance told in reverse.
  • The Leaving by Tara Altebrando (June 2016) promises to be a real page turner (blurbed by E. Lockhart!) about six children who were kidnapped. And the five who came back as teens.

MICRO-TREND ALERT: Thrillers are IN right now. I would even go so far as to call this a full-on trend. Forget the micro part.

Griffin Teen, Flatiron Books, Tor Teen & Starscape:

This one was tag-teamed by two publicists so there were LOTS. OF. BOOKS.

  • Truthwitch by Susan Dennard (January 5, 2016): epic fantasy where the main focus is friends NOT an all-consuming romance.
  • Riders by Veronica Rossi (February 2, 2016) is a dark fantasy where the four horsemen have to save the world.
  • Character Driven by Dave Lubar (March 1, 2016) is a funny book with an unreliable narrator. And no sci-fi elements despite coming from Tor.
  • If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo (May 6, 2016) is a high school romance with a transgender main character. The young woman on the cover is also a transgender model and I just think it’s great.
  • In American Girls by Allison Umminger (June 7, 2016) a girl runs away to LA only to have to find a job to work to earn enough to make her way back home.
  • In Real Life by Jessica Love (March 1, 2016) sounds a lot like Tonight the Streets Are Ours to me with its interplay or real life and online personas. It was also pitched as “The Hangover meets My Best Friend’s Wedding but for teens” so I really don’t know what more you need.

MICRO-TREND ALERT: Lots of stuff is being comped to The Hangover which I find oddly delightful.

  • Roshani Chokshi’s The Star-Touched Queen (May 3, 2016) is a fantasy inspired by Indian folklore.
  • The Only Thing Worse Than Me is You by Lily Anderson (May 17, 2016) is a debut that retells Much Ado About Nothing. I never did get to that play but I for one am intrigued.

HarperCollins Children’s Books:

  • I feel deeply and intensely betrayed by all of my bookish friends who never told me that Kevin Henkes and Laura Dronzek are married in real life. They have a new book coming called When Spring Comes (February 9, 2016) which looks lovely.
  • Pax by Sarah Pennypacker (illustrated by Jon Klassen) (February 2, 2016) is a publicist favorite about a boy and his fox.
  • Cammie McGovern makes her middle grade debut with Just My Luck (February 23, 2016) about a boy in fourth grade who has to deal with the chaos in his life while watching out for his brother who is autistic.
  • Wing & Claw by Linda Sue Park (March 1, 2016) is a series starter. With talking bats.
  • All Rise for the Honorable Perry T. Cook by Leslie Connor (March 1, 2016) is a book about a boy raised in the correctional facility where his mother is an inmate. Pitched as perfect for fans of Wonder and When You Reach Me.
  • Lauren Myracle has a new book called Wishing Day (May 2016) which sounds like a charming middle grade about the magic of wishing.
  • Front Lines by Michael Grant (January 26, 2016) is the start to a new alternate history series where girl soldiers are on the front lines of World War II.
  • The Girl From Everywhere by Heidi Heilig is a debut novel about a girl who can time travel. Pitched as Rae Carson meets Outlander.

MICRO-TREND ALERT: Many time travel novels are coming and I couldn’t be happier about it!

Albert Whitman & Co.:

  • The William Hoy Story by Nancy Churnin, illustrated by Jez Tuya (March 2016) looks awesome. William Hoy was a deaf baseball player who did not get a spot on the local deaf league. So he practiced and played until he became a professional player. Being deaf, Hoy had difficulty following the umpires calls and eventually worked with them to create the hand signals that are still used today. How cool is that?!
  • How Kate Warne Saved President Lincoln by Elizabeth Van Steenwyk, illustrated by Valentina Belloni (March 2016) tells the story of the first female Pinkerton detective and how she saved the president from a failed assassination attempt.
  • Of Better Blood by Susan Moger (February 2016) was blurbed by one of my favorite authors, Elizabeth Wein. It’s about a girl who recovers from polio and becomes tangled in the Eugenics movement that swept the US in 1922.

WW Norton & Co:

  • The Big Adventure of a Little Line by Serge Bloch (February 2016) is a story about a boy who finds a line and picks it up without another thought. A story about artistic development.
  • Miro’s Magic Animals by Antony Penrose (April 2016) looks at the famous artist’s work through a child’s eyes.
  • AbZzzz… A Bedtime Alphabet by Isabel Minhos Martins and Yara Kono (May 2016) is a fun bedtime alphabet book.

Harlequin Teen:

  • In Firstlife by Gena Showalter (February 2016) there is, in fact, life after death. And you get to choose where you live.
  • Heir to the Sky by Amanda Sun (April 2016) is a standalone high fantasy pitched as “Final Fantasy meets Castle in the Air.”
  • Bestseller Jennifer L. Armentrout is back with The Problem With Forever about a girl in foster care who has been homeschooled but decides to go to public school in her senior year.

After the break for lunch it was time for our second guest speaker. Barnabas Miller talked to the audience about his latest title The Girl With the Wrong Name which sounds absolutely fascinating. The story stems from some very personal inspiration for Miller and after hearing him speak, I cannot wait to read it.

Simon & Schuster:

  • I don’t actually have notes for The Night Gardener by the Fan Brothers (February 2013) but it has three stars on my handout and an owl topiary and magic and I have never needed a picture book so badly in my life.
  • Debut author Amber Smith’s The Way I Used to Be (March 2016) is being likened to Speak and takes place in four parts that span the main character’s four years in high school.
  • We Are the Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson (January 2016) follows a teen boy who must decide if the world is worth saving.
  • Tim Federle makes his YA debut in The Great American Whatever (March 2016) which is being called “laugh out loud sad.”

Check back for Part three later this week!