If You Don’t Have Anything Nice to Say: A Review

“It takes such a brief time to destroy someone’s life and forget that you ever did it. But rebuilding a life—that’s different. That takes forever.”

cover art for If You Don't Have Anything Nice to Say by Leila SalesWhat happens when the worst thing you ever said is the only thing people know about you?

Winter Halperin has always been good with words—something that served her well as a National Spelling Bee champion a few years ago.

Now, after thoughtlessly sharing one insensitive comment online, words (and the entirety of the internet) have turned against Winter.She is stripped of her Spelling Bee title, condemned by strangers, and loses her college acceptance.

Winter always thought she was a good person. She still does. But mounting evidence online suggests otherwise. So does the mounting panic Winter feels every time she looks herself up online. Because how can she stop looking when some new horror could be added at any moment?

As she grapples with the aftermath of The Incident Winter is forced to confront hard truths about her own bigotry and its role in what happened as well as the nature of public shaming in the internet age in If You Don’t Have Anything Nice to Say (2018) by Leila Sales.

Sales’ latest standalone novel is a timely, sometimes brutal contemporary novel. Winter is a white girl from a fairly well off family. Her comment–meant, she claims, as a fact-based joke on historical Bee winners–suggests that the latest winner of the National Spelling Bee (a twelve-year-old African American girl) can’t spell and is a surprising winner.

If You Don’t Have Anything Nice to Say starts with Winter posting that comment before bed and waking up to a nightmare of notifications, hateful messages, and other bad publicity as awareness of her comment grows and grows.

Although the novel is written in the first person Sales is careful to neither condone nor condemn Winter’s actions throughout. It’s up to readers to decide what punishment (or forgiveness) Winter may or may not deserve. When Winter develops crippling anxiety and panic attacks surrounding her online presence and what people are saying about her she enters a program to try and make amends for her actions and also to cope with the very public and very painful online shaming.

If You Don’t Have Anything Nice to Say is very plot driven without being high action. The focus of the story is squarely on what Winter did and the aftermath. The contrast between Winter confronting her own internalized bigotry/racism while also being subjected to such intense online shaming is incredibly powerful and thought provoking.

Winter is not always a likable character. It’s easy to feel bad for her as she faces death threats, of course. But it’s also hard to understand her thoughtlessness or how she is more focused on how many likes her joke might receive than on how hurtful it could be. In other words, Winter is a lot like many people who are active on social media.

Winter’s character arc balances dealing with the fallout both internally as she confronts her own biases/bigotry that she hasn’t grappled with before with the very public shaming. Does Winter learn anything from The Incident? Maybe, probably. Is it enough? Readers will have to judge that on their own.

If You Don’t Have Anything Nice to Say is a timely novel that will start a lot of hard but necessary conversations.

Possible Pairings: Love, Hate, and Other Filters by Samira Ahmed, Social Media Wellness: Helping Tweens and Teens Thrive in an Unbalanced Digital World by Ana Homayoun, All American Boys by Brendan Kiely and Jason Reynolds, The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas, Hit Makers: The Science of Popularity in an Age of Distraction by Derek Thompson, American Street by Ibi Zoboi

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Week in Review: April 28–Operation Blog Overhaul is Complete

missprintweekreviewThis week on the blog you can check out:

This year I’ve reluctantly switched from yahoo to gmail after one too many yahoo problems. After migrating my blog email to a new address, I decided it was high time to update my blog pages along with my contact information. For the past week or so I’ve been tweaking my theme and side bar, simplifying pages, and consolidating features like my Review Index. I’m really happy with the end product and I hope if you’re a regular reader that you are too.

This week I read Emergency Contact by Mary H. K. Choi and I am obsessed. It’s such a great read. My review is coming (once I write it) but don’t wait for that to add this gem to your to read list.

Who is in your support system? 📚 Penny Lee is a freshman eager to get away from the drama that always seems to surround her mom who is sadly a MILF. Sam Becker dropped out of college when he couldn’t afford it. He’s still trying to piece his life together post breakup when his ex (aka Liar) drops a bombshell. 📚 You wouldn’t think Penny Lee and Sam Becker would have a lot in common. But when Penny finds Sam having a panic attack in the middle of the street she’s the one who talks him down. She’s the one who wants him to text her when he gets home and, maybe most importantly, she’s the one that suggests they could be each other’s emergency contact. 📚 Both of them are hazy on the rules for emergency contacts but as they start texting Penny and Sam realize they might have more in common than they thought. Their friendship helps both of them take risks and step outside of their comfort zones. But neither one of them is sure if they’ll ever be ready to take the biggest leap by bringing their virtual friendship into the real world. 📚 You guys! I knew I was going to like this book (I mean the cover is gorgeous and millennial pink, come on!) but I did not expect to love it this much. Choi’s writing is authentic and sardonic and so great. Penny and Sam are flawed characters with a lot of baggage but I love them so much. I’m about halfway through and am majorly sad I can’t sit down right now and keep reading. 📚 #instabooks #currentlyreading #amreading #instareads #bookgram #bookworm #bookblogging #bookblogger #bookstagrammer #bibliophile #booklove #bookphotography #instabook #reading #reader #booktography #bookstagram #igreads #booksofinstagram #goodreads #bookaholic #bookish #bookishfeature #bookstafeatures #bookstagramfeature #readersofinstagram #unitedbookstagram #emergencycontact #maryhkchoi #supportsystem

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Speaking of reviews I have been working hard to get to a lot of my backlog. It’s currently down to eight and I’m feeling good about my progress.

I also had a bit of a bookstagram breakthrough last Sunday. I try to shoot a few photos to use during the week (since I pledged to post daily and photos don’t take themselves) and since I’m obviously a book blogger I have decided to focus on . . . books. This week I did flat lays on my white melamine desk and, guys, I’m never going back. The photos were so easy to take. The white melamine looks great even in my apartment’s lousy lighting. I’m so happy with the results.

Here are two of my favorite posts I shared on Instagram this week:

What’s your favorite classic novel? ▪️ I have a few although I don’t own a lot of them except for Jane Austen’s big three and Little Women. I know it’s a divisive one but Moby Dick is another one of my favorites. I love the language and the style and I love Ishmael. ▪️ I traded for this notebook from @publikumart a while ago after seeing it in November’s @uppercasebox. I just found this postcard in my new set from @obviousstate. When I realized they both had quotes from Melville and that I could use my compasses to round out the composition the picture practically took itself. ▪️ #instabooks #instareads #bookgram #bookworm #bookblogging #bookblogger #bookstagrammer #bibliophile #booklove #bookphotography #instabook #reading #reader #booktography #bookstagram #igreads #booksofinstagram #goodreads #bookaholic #bookish #bookishfeature #bookstafeatures #bookstagramfeature #readersofinstagram #unitedbookstagram #classics #mobydick #hermanmelville #uppercasebox #bookishmerch

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Do you enjoy books with multiple narrators? ✨ I love them—especially books like this one written in close third person but following multiple people. ✨ Natasha believes in science and facts. Which is why it's so hard to hope for a miracle on her last day in New York City. Natasha's family is going to be deported to Jamaica in twelve hours. Natasha doesn't believe in long shots but it's the only shot she has left to try and stay in the city that's been her home since she was a child. She doesn't have time to waste meeting a cute boy and maybe falling in love with him. Not when she is so busy trying to balance her practical nature with her hopes for some last-minute magic. ✨ Daniel is used to being a good son. Not the best son because that's always been his older brother. Except now his brother screwed up big time and Daniel's parents are pinning their hopes for having a Successful-Ivy-League-Graduate-Doctor in the family on Daniel. The problem is that Daniel wants to be a poet–something his Korean immigrant parents can't understand. At. All. Daniel believes in poetry and fate which is why he knows the moment he sees Natasha that their lives are about the change forever. ✨ It feels like the universe or fate or something Big is conspiring to bring Natasha and Daniel into each others' lives. But over the course of a day filled with possibility, neither Natasha nor Daniel is sure if that will be enough to keep them together. ✨ I was tagged by @deadtossedwaves to do the #cloudsandstars tag: ⭐️Clouds or Stars: Stars ☁️ Ink or Pencil: Ink ⭐️Sunshine or Moonlight: Both ☁️Beach or Forest: Forest ⭐️Mountain or Ocean: Ocean ☁️Head or Heart: Head ⭐️Jumper or Shirt: Shirt ☁️Wood or Stone: Wood ⭐️Dusk or Dawn: Dawn ☁️Feel free to tag yourself! ✨ #instabooks #currentlyreading #amreading #instareads #bookgram #bookworm #bookblogging #bookblogger #bookstagrammer #bibliophile #booklove #bookphotography #instabook #reading #reader #booktography #bookstagram #igreads #booksofinstagram #goodreads #bookaholic #bookish #bookishfeature #bookstafeatures #bookstagramfeature #readersofinstagram #unitedbookstagram #thesunisalsoastar #nicolayoon

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If you you want to see how my month in reading is shaking out be sure to check out my April Reading Tracker.

How was your week? What are you reading?

Speak: The Graphic Novel: A Chick Lit Wednesday (Graphic Novel) Review

cover art for Speak: The Graphic Novel by Laurie Halse Anderson, illustrated by Emily CarrollMelinda remembers when she looked forward to starting high school. It was a new chapter filled with promise. She’d have the  chance to become anyone she wanted.

That was before the end of summer. Before what happened at the party.

Now Melinda is alone. Her parents are too busy hating each other and their lives to pay any attention to why Melinda stopped speaking let alone anything else. At school everyone knows that Melinda is the one who called 911 and brought the cops to the biggest party of the summer.

Art class is Melinda’s one refuge. She doesn’t have to think about the best friends who abandoned her or the new girl who calls her a friend when it’s convenient. She doesn’t have to worry about trying to talk to David Petrakis. She doesn’t even have to think about what happened at the party. All she has to do is draw trees.

Melinda starts the school year as an observer–an outsider. She isn’t okay. But with her art, a reclaimed supply closet, and some time, Melinda might be able to reclaim her voice in Speak: The Graphic Novel (2018) by Laurie Halse Anderson, illustrated by Emily Carroll.

This book is the graphic novel adaptation of Anderson’s award winning novel of the same name. Although Speak was originally published in 1999 Melinda’s story remains just as timely and immediate in this new version.

In many ways, Speak: The Graphic Novel feels like the form this story should have always had. Anderson’s story is complemented by Carroll’s eerie black and white illustrations. The format allows the story to shift easily between Melinda’s reality and her imaginings. Carefully constructed page designs also help evoke a palpable sense of Melinda’s silence and her introspection for much of the novel.

Speak has been a must-read since its original publication. This graphic novel adaptation underscores the story’s significance and makes it approachable for a whole new segment of readers.

Possible Pairings: Saints and Misfits by S. K. Ali, Starfish by Akemi Dawn Bowman, Lighter Than My Shadow by Katie Green, I Kill Giants by Joe Kelly, Boy Toy by Barry Lyga, Criminal by Terra Elan McVoy, Monster: The Graphic Novel by Walter Dean Myers, Adapted by Guy Sims, Illustrated by David Anyabwile; The Summer of Chasing Mermaids by Sarah Ockler, A Map of the Known World by Lisa Ann Sandell

Girl Power Graphic Novels Blog Tour: Featuring Cucumber Quest!

Girl Power Graphic Novels Blog Tour HeaderI always love finding new graphic novels and comics so I was thrilled when I got the chance to join First:Second’s Girl Power Graphic Novels Blog Tour.

While all of the comics were delightful, a new favorite quickly emerged the moment I opened Cucumber Question: The Doughnut Kingdom (2017) and its sequel Cucumber Quest: The Ripple Kingdom (2018) by Gigi D. G.

In Dreamside in a house in the Doughnut Kingdom a young rabbit named Cucumber is preparing to head to magic school. His plans are dashed when his parents reveal that Cucumber is the latest in a line of Legendary Heroes and it is his destiny to save The Doughnut Kingdom and Dreamside from the Nightmare Knight.

While Cucumber appreciates the predicament, he’d much rather go to magic school and leave saving the world to literally anyone else. Luckily (or perhaps not) Cucumber’s younger sister Almond is all about adventure, swords, and fighting so she is more than ready to drag Cucumber along on this epic quest.

Saving the kingdom won’t be easy when allies include a hapless Dream Oracle and a knight armed with little more than charm and a flimsy spear. The quest will take both young rabbits far from home as they travel across Dreamside to gather the tools they need to save the day.

Cucumber Quest: The Doughnut Kingdom is a great introduction to D. G.’s vivid and bizarre world (which started life as a webcomic before the volumes were collected by First:Second) as Cucumber and Almond embark on their journey to try and stop the Nightmare Knight. The adventure continues in Cucumber Quest: The Ripple Kingdom when (spoiler) the Nightmare Knight does in fact return and he and his minions need to be stopped–one kingdom at a time.

The first book includes a great map of The Doughnut Kingdom (shown above) and trading card style intros for all of the characters. Volume Two’s bonus material has more character trading cards and a tourist guide to Cucumber and Almond’s next stop: The Ripple Kingdom. D. G. uses a surprisingly color palette that is bright without being jarring. The comic panels are dynamic and filled with amazingly expressive characters.

These comics are zany and incredibly clever. The cast is filled with strong characters including the mysterious thief, Saturday, and the charmingly forgetful Princess Nautilus. Then of course there’s Almond, the girl who would happily save the world if only any of the adults in Dreamside would let her. Cucumber astutely engages with a lot of the obvious flaws in quest stories (How is Cucumber really the best choice for this? Why is it so easy to resurrect the Nightmare Knight anyway? What’s up with his dad in that cell?) while also embodying everything that makes quest stories so fun (reluctant hero! adventure! mayhem!).

I can’t wait to see what happens when Cucumber, Almond, and the rest of their team head to The Ripple Kingdom.

Be sure to check out all of the titles featured on the blog tour too:

  • Scarlett Hart: Monster Hunter by Marcus Sedgwick and Thomas Taylor: A Victorian tale of derring-do and also girls fighting monsters.
  • Cucumber Quest by Gigi D.G: A bunny-filled fantasy adventure of a kingdom in distress and some reluctant (and non-reluctant) heroes.
  • The City on the Other Side by Mairghread Scott and Robin Robinson: A historical San Francisco adventure of a girl who accidentally ends up in fairyland.
  • Star Scouts by Mike Lawrence: A girl scout adventure–but in outer space!
  • Monsters Beware! by Jorge Aguirre and Rafael Rosado: A fantasy adventure of defying expectations and friendship (and monsters).

You can also check out these blog tour stops:

Week in Review: April 21–Pokemon Go is consuming my life

missprintweekreviewThis week on the blog you can check out:

I was a ball of nerves this week. I was feeling pretty slammed between intern work and committee work and it was not a good time having to balance both with a lot of deadlines all at the same time. I’m feeling much better now and am looking forward to things settling down.

Last Sunday Nicole and I had a belated celebration for her birthday and it was awesome. We went to Milk and Cream Cereal Bar which was delicious (we both want to go back which says a lot!), then walked to the Strand. We did some window shopping and some shopping shopping. And I caught a ton of Mareeps in Pokemon Go which is one of my new favorite Pokemon. It was a big day all around.

What’s your favorite flavor of ice cream? 🍦 I like almost any ice cream. This is a combination of Vanilla ice cream blended with Cocoa Puffs with chocolate drizzle and banana toppings from @milkandcreambar. 🍦 For her belated birthday celebration @thebookbandit and I went to Milk and Cream Cereal Bar to try another wacky spin on ice cream. This was mine and you can swipe through to see Nicole’s (Vanilla with Reese’s Puffs, strawberry drizzle, and bananas) and some of the decor. The place was bright, airy and filled with cut decor including TVs showing retro cartoons. Being a cold Sunday right near opening time we even got seats for a leisurely eat. 🍦 This one was a lot of fun. Possibly a bit spendy (ours were both about $8) but filling and I’m honestly already planning a second trip back. 🍦 #icecream #milkandcream #milkandcreambar #milkandcreamcerealbar #vanilla #latergram #nofilter #newyorkcity #newyork #lowermanhattan #littleitaly #chinatown #chinatownnyc #dessert #foodie #dessertfirst #chocolate #cocoapuffs #cereal #restaurant #foodphotography #foodtrip #yum

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Here are two of my favorite posts I shared on Instagram this week:

Starting this week with a surprise favorite that I still return to often: The Keeper of the Mist by Rachel Neumeier. 📚 Keri's main focus since her mother's death has been running the family bakery on her own. She doesn't have much time to think about her father, the Lord of Nimmira, who has never wasted a thought on Keri. Nor is she inclined to entertain predictions about which of her half-brothers will take up the title of Lord upon their father's death. 📚 When Nimmira's ancient and inscrutable magic chooses Keri as the unlikely heir her focus shifts abruptly from baking to overseeing all manner of details implicit to overseeing her small country as its new Lady. Caught between larger countries eager to conquer each other and absorb its resources, Nimmira has relied on its border mists and a strict policy of isolation for generations. Keri should be able to control and maintain the mists as the new Lady. Except they continue to fail after her ascension and no one knows why. 📚 Keri's Timekeeper is counting the seconds, minutes, and hours to something important. But he can't–or perhaps won't–explain what exactly that is or how Keri can prepare for it. Keri's best friend Tassel acclimates quickly to her role as Bookkeeper but even her magic can't help unravel some of Nimmira's deepest secrets. Then there's Cort, Keri's unlikely Doorkeeper. Cort is steadfast in his commitment to protecting and maintaining Nimmira's borders. But will he and Keri finally be able to see eye to eye as they try to restore the mist? 📚 Change is coming to Nimmira. Only time will tell if Keri and her friends will be ready to face it. 📚 #instabooks #amreading #instareads #bookgram #bookworm #bookblogging #bookblogger #bookstagrammer #bibliophile #booklove #bookphotography #instabook #reading #reader #booktography #bookstagram #igreads #booksofinstagram #goodreads #bookaholic #bookish #bookishfeature #bookstafeatures #bookstagramfeature #readersofinstagram #unitedbookstagram #fantasy #rachelneumeier #thekeeperofthemist

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"Secrets are like bullets." 📚 Reece Murphy never wanted to become the notorious Rose Kid. But he never had a choice. 📚 Charlotte Vaughn hopes that following a lead on a big story will help jump start her career as a journalist and bring her one step closer toward self-sufficiency and thwarting her uncle’s efforts to steal her mother’s inheritance. 📚 Both Reece and Charlotte's plans are derailed when they cross paths on opposite sides of a botched train robbery. Charlotte could be Reece's chance for freedom while Reece offers Charlotte the story of a lifetime. Charlotte and Reece know better than to trust each other but they both hope that with a little luck and a lot of grit they can use each other to get what they need. 📚 Westerns are an inherently problematic genre but still count a few as favorites. Retribution is one such book filled with anti-heroes worth cheering on, evocative settings and loads of adventure. 📚 I was tagged by @cassieopiabooks and @deadtossedwaves to do the #top3fandomsmerch tag. (Tagging some friends and anyone else who wants to join!) 1. The Hunger Games 2. The Darkest Minds 3. The Raven Cycle 📚 #instabooks #amreading #instareads #bookgram #bookworm #bookblogging #bookblogger #bookstagrammer #bibliophile #booklove #bookphotography #instabook #reading #booktography #bookstagram #igreads #booksofinstagram #goodreads #bookaholic #bookish #bookishfeature #bookstafeatures #bookstagramfeature #readersofinstagram #unitedbookstagram #western #erinbowman #retributionrails #vengeanceroad

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If you you want to see how my month in reading is shaking out be sure to check out my April Reading Tracker.

How was your week? What are you reading?

The Stone Girl’s Story: A Chick Lit Wednesday Review

The Stone Girl's Story by Sarah Beth DurstMayka and her stone family were brought to life by the markings etched into their bodies–symbols that represent who they are and the stories of their live. Mayka’s father was a talented stonemason. He created fish that could swim, rabbits, birds, and even a turtle before he used everything he had learned to create Mayka a girl who lives and thinks even if she does not need to breath or eat the way humans do.

But stone erodes over time and Mayka’s father is no longer alive to tend to his stone creations. Without a stonemason to maintain them, the stone creature’s markings are fading. Unless a stonemason can recarve their markings Mayka and her stone family will cease to live–becoming nothing more than still statues.

Finding a stonemason won’t be easy. It will force Mayka to leave the only home she has ever known high up on her family’s mountain. Off the mountain Mayka discovers that there is more to the magic that brings her to life than Father ever let on. When her search for a stonemason reveals a threat to all stone creatures, Mayka may not have any time left to wait for a stonemason to save her in The Stone Girl’s Story (2018) by Sarah Beth Durst.

Durst’s latest standalone middle grade fantasy is an evocative adventure where, with the right markings, stone can be brought to life. Durst once again brings her imaginative vision to life in a novel whose heroine is as surprising as her world.

Mayka’s stone family consists of herself and a variety of talking animals eager to help in the search for a new stonemason. The high stakes of this mission are offset with the wonder and enthusiasm with which Mayka explores new lands and makes some surprising friends.

The Stone Girl’s Story is an engrossing adventure and a thoughtful commentary on agency as Mayka realizes that the best way to save herself and her friends might be to do it herself. A delightful addition to the author’s extensive body of work.

Possible Pairings: A Tale of Two Castles by Gail Carson Levine, Princess Academy by Shannon Hale, Frogkisser! by Garth Nix, Princeless Book One: Save Yourself by Jeremy Whitley and M. Goodwin

Be sure to check out my interview with Sarah about this book!

Author Interview (#11): Sarah Beth Durst on The Stone Girl’s Story

Sarah Beth Durst author photoSarah Beth Durst, one of my favorite authors, is back today to talk about her latest middle grade novel The Stone Girl’s Story which follows Mayka, a living girl made of stone, as she ventures far from home to find a way to help herself and her friends.

Miss Print (MP): What was the inspiration for The Stone Girl’s Story?

Sarah Beth Durst (SBD): I’m a terrible gardener.  Zero green thumb.  Plants see me coming, and they wither in self-defense, anticipating a horrible death from either too much or too little watering.  But I try.  And I’m always optimistic that next year, I’ll remember to weed/water/whatever often enough to have a lovely flower bed.

One spring, after hearing me talk all winter about flowers, my husband bought me a little stone rabbit for my garden, and I nestled it in between the daffodils.  But by the end of the summer, it was so buried in weeds that I couldn’t find it.  So I joked that it had hopped away to join its other stone friends…

That stone bunny became the inspiration for THE STONE GIRL’S STORY (and you’ll see him hopping around the first chapter as one of Mayka’s friends!).

Mayka is a girl made of living stone.  Forever twelve years old, she has outlasted the father who carved her and engraved her body with the stories that gave her life. But now the magical marks that animate her and her stone friends are fading, and she must leave her home for the first time to find help if she wants her story — and those of her friends — to continue.

At its heart, this is a story about stories — what stories shape who you are, who chooses the stories that define you, who tells the story of your life.

MP: Stone creatures in Mayka’s world are brought to life by markings carved into their bodies that describe various attributes and parts of their lives. If you were a stone creature, what are some markings you would want to include in your story?

SBD: I would want my markings to say how much I love stories — really, I think they’re as essential to life as air, water, and food — and how much I love to tell stories.  And I would want my markings to say how much I love my family.  Those are the two things that are most important to me: writing and my family.

Might also want to add a marking saying how fond I am of chocolate.

MP: Mayka leaves her home to find a new stonemason and gets to see the world beyond her mountain home for the first time. Reading this story I was struck by how vivid the locations and landscapes are as Mayka discovers them. Did any real locations inspire the places that Mayka visits?

SBD: Not intentionally, but the world does seep into you and then come out in your writing.  Things you think are beautiful, things you think are important, things that stick in your memory…  All of those things fertilize the soil of your imagination.

Mayka’s world is born of my imagination, but it’s shaped by my love of this world.

MP: Which scene are you especially excited for readers to get to in The Stone Girl’s Story?

SBD: One of the best things about being a writer is being able to invite people into your worlds, your stories, and your imagination.  I can’t wait for readers to meet Mayka and her friends!  I am especially excited for readers to meet Si-Si, a little stone dragon that Mayka encounters on her quest.

I think all stories need at least one talking dragon.  :)

MP: This is a busy year for you with three novels coming out. Last year was equally jam-packed with your YA novel Drink, Slay, Love’s movie adaptation coming out and the release of your first picture book Roar and Sparkles Go to School. (I love that you literally write for all ages now!) With so many projects going on at once how do you balance everything? What does a typical writing day look like for you?

SBD: I write every day.  I know that doesn’t work for everyone, but I find it helpful for keeping up the momentum of the story.  I don’t have a set time or consistent number of hours that I write each day — basically any time I have two hands free and am near my computer, I’m writing.

I typically work on one project at a time.  It takes me a couple days to switch between voices, styles, and worlds, so I prefer to work on one book for a few weeks/months (depending on where it is in the process) and then make the transition to another.

I also always like to know what I’m going to be writing next and will often start a new book on the same day that I finish the prior book.  I don’t like saying goodbye to characters that I’ve grown to love, so it helps if I can immediately say hello to new ones!

MP: Can you tell us anything about your next projects?

SBD: Yes!  My next book for adults comes out on May 15th: THE QUEEN OF SORROW, Book Three of The Queens of Renthia.  It’s the final book in my epic fantasy series about bloodthirsty spirits and the queens who can control them.  Very excited for readers to see how it all ends!

In December, my next YA book, FIRE AND HEIST, comes out.  It’s essentially Ocean’s Eleven with were-dragons.  I just posted the gorgeous new cover over on my website (www.sarahbethdurst.com/FireandHeist.htm).

And I’m currently in the middle of revising next year’s MG book (SPARK, about a girl and her lightning dragon) and adult book (THE DEEPEST BLUE, a standalone Renthia novel with a lot of sea monsters).

Thanks so much for interviewing me!

Thanks to Sarah for taking the time to answer my questions!

For more information about Sarah and her books you can also visit her website.

You can also check out our previous interviews discussing Sarah’s other novels here on the blog.

If you want to know more about The Stone Girl’s Story be sure to check out my  review.