September 2017 Reading Tracker

You can also see what I read in August.

Books Read:

  1. Speak Easy, Speak Love by McKelle George
  2. Murder, Magic, and What We Wore by Kelly Jones
  3. Be True to Me by Adele Griffin
  4. Girls Made of Snow and Glass by Melissa Bashardoust
  5. All Rights Reserved by Gregory Scott Katsoulis
  6. Beasts Made of Night by Tochi Onyebuchi
  7. The Orphan Queen by Jodi Meadows
  8. The Empress by S. J. Kincaid
  9. The Mirror King by Jodi Meadows

Books On Deck:

  1. Berserker by Emmy Laybourne (Oct.)

Books Bought:

  1. Before She Ignites by Jodi Meadows (signing)
  2. The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco (signing)

ARCs Received:

  1. Don’t Cosplay With My Heart by Cecil Castellucci (unrequested)
  2. The Vanderbeekers Of 141st Street by Karina Yan Glaser (vine)
  3. Frau Faust volume 1 by Kore Yamazaki (vine)

September 1, 2017: September snuck up on me!

September 13, 2017: Continuing my efforts to cut down my to read shelf and it’s finally starting to feel like I am making solid progress. This weekend I got all of my to read books back onto one bookcase (with two shelves double stacked, but still).

Summer in the Invisible City: A Chick Lit Wednesday Review

“In some ways, it doesn’t matter what happened next, or in the year and a half since then. That night was perfect and I’ll always have it. I’ll hold on to the memory tight as I want, because it’s mine.”

Summer in the Invisible City by Juliana RomanoSadie Bell knows exactly what she wants to happen during the summer before her senior year of high school. She is going to befriend the popular girls at her school after bonding during their summer photography class. She is going to see her father for the first time in years and it will be better this time because they’ll have art in common and she can finally impress him with her photos. She is definitely going to get over Noah after pining over him and stewing over all of the mistakes she made with him eighteen months ago.

Almost as soon as it starts, Sadie’s summer isn’t what she expects. Her photography class is great. But making new friends comes with new challenges. Her father remains as distant as ever. Noah seems to be popping up everywhere both in Sadie’s memories and in real life. Then there’s Sam–the boy Sadie never expected to meet–who only wants to be friends even as Sadie thinks she might want more.

Life seems simple when it’s seen through a photograph and the details are clear. Real life, it turns out, is much less focused. To understand all of the things she’s had along, Sadie may have to give her entire life a second look in Summer in the Invisible City (2016) by Juliana Romano.

This standalone contemporary novel is set over the course of one summer in New York City (mostly Manhattan). Readers familiar with the city will recognize familiar settings and smart nods to the city (high school friends from Xavier, movies in Union Square with candy smuggled in from Duane Reade) while realizing that Sadie lives in a privileged (largely white) version of New York.

Narrated by Sadie both in the present and in flashbacks of time spent with Noah or her father, Summer in the Invisible City asks a lot of questions about relationships and how much someone should have to give up to maintain them. Sadie is desperate for approval from the people she thinks matter whether it’s popular girls, older guys, or her father. Sadie is so eager to show that she belongs with them that she spends most of the novel alienating the friends and family who have always been supporting her including her single mother and her best friend, Willa. Readers will soon realize that Sadie is sometimes self-destructive but her growth and development during the novel is all the sweeter because of that.

This nuanced story is further complicated by the poorly executed plot surrounding Sadie’s efforts to connect with her father. By the end of the story Sadie’s fraught relationship with her father is explained and reaches an unsatisfying but realistic resolution. What doesn’t make sense at any point in the story, is how things get to that point. Sadie has a loving and supportive mother. She is already eight or nine when she first meets her father and has seen him scant times since. Where does the idolatry come from? Sadie’s mother, unlike a lot of fictional parents, doesn’t sugarcoat his shortcomings anymore than she encourages a false sense of closeness and connection. That all comes from Sadie for reasons that are never clearly articulated in the text. (On a separate note, given the father’s absence for most of Sadie’s life, it’s also unclear why or how he and Sadie share a last name.)

Summer in the Invisible City is partly a summery romance and partly a story about a young artist finding her eye and voice with what she chooses to capture and present in her artwork. Reading about Sadie’s process and vision as she searches out new photography material is inspiring and compelling enough to erase questions debating whether or not print photography is on the verge of obsolescence. Recommended for readers who are fans of novels set in New York City, artists or aspiring artists, and fans of contemporary romances with a healthy dose of introspection.

Possible Pairings: Guy in Real Life by Steve Brezenoff, City Love by Susane Colasanti,  How to Love by Katie Cotugno, My Life Next Door by Huntley Fitzpatrick, Just One Day by Gayle Forman, Making Pretty by Corey Ann Haydu, Everywhere You Want to Be by Christina June, Lola and the Boy Next Door by Stephanie Perkins, The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

This Adventure Ends: A Review

Sloane doesn’t have a lot of expectations when her family moves from New York City to a small Florida town to help her writer father find inspiration. In fact, Sloane doesn’t have many expectations about anything. She’s used to being a loner and focusing her singing and her family. It’s always been fine.

A chance encounter at a party draws Sloane into the vibrant and unexpected world of social media sensation Vera, her twin brother Gabe, and their close-knit group of friends. Sloane never thought she’d fit in so well with anyone. Until she does.

When a treasured painting by the twins’ deceased mother disappears, Sloane wants nothing so much as to help them. On her hunt to track down the painting and get it back, Sloane learns more about her new friends and herself as she discovers that some adventures can end unexpectedly while others are just the beginning in This Adventure Ends (2016) by Emma Mills.

This standalone contemporary focuses on characters with a meandering plot that gives Sloane and her new friends plenty of room to shine–particularly when it comes to Frank Sanger who remains one of the most enigmatic (and sadly minor) characters. Sloane’s first-person narration is relaxed and witty, filled with slick descriptions of her new surroundings and clever barbs about her new social group.

This Adventure Ends branches out from Sloane’s initial quest for the missing painting to explore the nature of creativity, grief, and even ambition. Sloane’s father, a Nicholas Sparks type writer, adds another dimension to this story with his own explorations of fan fiction and authorial intent. Sloane’s mother and younger sister, by contrast, remain woefully one-dimensional and serve as little more than a tantalizing missed opportunity for more complex characterization.

Although this story doesn’t tie everything up neatly, it does suggest that most problems can be solved even if it isn’t always in the way we hope or expect–a comforting thought for teens facing college on the horizon. Quality writing and fascinating characters elevate this promising if familiar story and hint at what Mills will accomplish in future projects. This Adventure Ends is an introspective diversion recommended for readers seeking a smart, summery read.

Possible Pairings: What to Say Next by Julie Buxbaum, Words in Deep Blue by Cath Crowley, In a Perfect World by Trish Doller, The Last True Poets of the Sea by Julia Drake, Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson, Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins, Even in Paradise by Chelsea Philpot, The Beginning of Everything by Robyn Schneider

Week in Review: August 26

missprintweekreviewThis week on the blog you can check out:

Does anyone even believe me when I saw I thought I had these scheduled anymore?

This week was the end of summer programming at work which was fun but happy to go back to school-year scheduling now for a change of pace. I sewed a bow at one of our teen craft programs–it’s super cute.

Honestly, beyond that my biggest accomplishment is that I caught all four of the Legendary birds in Pokemon Go.

If you you want to see how my month in reading is shaking out be sure to check out my August Reading Tracker.

How was your week? What are you reading?

Let’s talk in the comments.

The One That Got Away: A Review

Ruby has the perfect life in New York City. She is great at her job, she lives alone in a chic Manhattan studio apartment. She is making it.

But as she prepares to head to England for her sister’s wedding, even Ruby has to admit that she might not be thriving. Her life is divided between work and her weekly gym sessions. There isn’t time for anything else with such a demanding job. But Ruby isn’t sure that matters in the face of having her NYC dreams become reality.

Heading to England couldn’t come at a worse time. But then again there’s never a good time to watch your sister marry the best friend of your ex-boyfriend. Ruby and Ethan were a perfect pair until they weren’t. Now, ten years later, the sting of that painful breakup lingers.

Seeing Ethan again brings back a lot of old memories. Enough that Ruby starts to wonder if walking away all those years ago was ever the right choice in The One That Got Away (2017) by Melissa Pimentel.

This standalone contemporary romance is a modern retelling of Jane Austen’s Persuasion complete with the English setting. The story has a rocky start with a New York City backdrop that is largely divorced from reality particular for a professional thirty-something.The story picks up as Ruby heads to England but the characters never quite manage to fit the plot they are given.

This disconnect deepens as the story progresses. Both Ruby and Ethan are haunted by regrets and fear of wasted opportunities. Making up for lost time, more than anything, is the theme of this light romance. Despite the characters being close to the age of Austen’s own heroine and hero, Ruby and Ethan’s concerns make more sense for characters who are older. While Ethan is a tech wunderkind with tons of talent and money but the idea that Ruby is already not just situated in her career but stagnating feels false. This might be a personal thing as a thirty-something myself who is far from stable but Ruby’s life and her problems felt like the property of a character at least a decade older.

The One That Got Away is a snappy romance complimented by Ruby’s first person narration in a storyline that explores her past with Ethan as well as her present. Recommended for readers looking for a new romance from a fresh voice.

*An advance copy of this title was provided by the publisher for review consideration*

If I Fix You: A Chick Lit Wednesday Review

Jill Whitaker knows the exact moment she fell out of love with Sean Addison. It was the same moment she caught him in a compromising position with her mother. It was just before her mother walked out leaving behind nothing but a post-it note by way of explanation.

In the aftermath of that horrible day, Jill is trying to relearn the intricacies of her life. She still works with her father at his garage. (She isn’t about to give up fixing cars when she could turn a wrench before she could tie her shoes.) She runs cross country with her best friend Claire to train for the high school track team. Sean is there too, but Jill isn’t sure how to be around him yet. She isn’t sure if she’ll ever be able to fix everything that has broken between them.

When a new guy moves in next door, Jill finds herself trying to fix him too. But as Jill gets closer to Daniel she realizes that his problems (and his scars) may be bigger than she imagined. There’s also the small matter that despite their obvious chemistry Daniel is twenty-one. Jill used to be able to fix anything but before she can move on, she’s going to have to learn how to fix herself in If I Fix You (2016) by Abigail Johnson.

Find it on Bookshop.

If I Fix You is Johnson’s excellent debut novel.

Jill is a thoughtful and entertaining heroine. Her first person narration is conversational and breezy filled with evocative descriptions of a hot Arizona summer. Jill’s love for cars and skills as a mechanic are unexpected and add another dimension to this story.

I enjoyed Claire as a best friend and counterpoint for Jill but I do want to say that it was frustrating to see Claire described as overweight before her Type 2 Diabetes diagnosis and her subsequent efforts to get healthy which included becoming more athletic which, it turns out, she really enjoys. The conflation of being overweight with Type 2 Diabetes is a really tired and damaging stereotype. It’s also not at all accurate (going with the little information given by the author Claire should even have her diabetes under control if not reversed with her fitness and food regimen) and was one dark spot in an otherwise excellent story.

Johnson negotiates a complicated love triangle well. Jill’s interactions with both Sean and Daniel are fascinating with chemistry that is tangible. While the romance is a huge part of the story, If I Fix You is really about Jill and her own choices as she tries to decide how to move forward after the painful heartbreak of her mother’s departure.

If I Fix You is a solid and often unexpected contemporary romance. Recommended for readers who enjoy stories about characters pulling themselves back from the brink, books with chipper best friends, and romances that keep you guessing.

Possible Pairings: The Queen of Bright and Shiny Things by Ann Aguirre, Suffer Love by Ashley Herring Blake, This Raging Light by Estelle Laure, When We Collided by Emery Lord, Falling Through Darkness by Carolyn MacCullough, The Edge of Falling by Rebecca Serle

Kissing in America: A Review

Kissing in America by Margo RabbEva Roth’s father died two years ago. She tells everyone it was the result of a heart attack because the real answer–that he died in a plane crash–is too sensational and messy. No one asks more questions about a heart attack.

Eva’s father was always the one who understood her, the one she’d sit with and write. In his absence Eva feels more friction than anything else when it comes to her women’s studies professor mother–something her mother suspects is at the root of Eva’s love of romance novels.

When Eva meets Will Freeman it seems like she might have found someone who really understands. Someone who can possibly help her to move past her grief. Until he moves away.

Afraid of losing Will and everything he promises, Eva and her best friend Annie Kim make a plan to travel across the country to find Will again. Along the way Eva and Annie will see unexpected pieces of the country and learn some surprising things about love in Kissing in America (2015) by Margo Rabb.

Kissing in America is Rabb’s followup to her YA debut Cures for Heartbreak. This novel treads similar territory as Eva tries to find her way through grief and her teen years. Although it is often touted as a light romance and a summery read, this story is filled with melancholy and very much mired in Eva’s grief.

Rabb’s writing remains superlative and evocative. Eva’s love of poetry also plays out in the novel with references to and poems from Elizabeth Bishop, Emily Dickinson, Adrienne Rich, Nikki Giovanni, Marie Howe, and other authors add another layer to this story. While this book is marketed as a romance, it is really Eva’s relationship with her best friend and with her mother that makes Kissing in America shine.

Eva’s mother in an interesting character who is a vocal feminist and a women’s studies professor. She terms Eva’s love of romance novels as a rebellion which never quite rings true as the romance genre is one where women are able to dominate the market and a genre that is often referenced for its feminist elements and even promoting female equality. That this never comes up in the story remains a frustrating omission.

Kissing in America is a thoughtful and witty road trip story about best friends, family, grieving and, of course, love. Recommended for readers looking for a smart read that will have them smiling through the tears.

Possible Pairings: Suffer Love by Ashley Herring Blake, Tell Me Three Things by Julie Buxbaum, Life by Committee by Corey Ann Haydu, Foolish Hearts by Emma Mills, Wild Swans by Jessica Spotswood, Black and White by Paul Volponi, Cloudwish by Fiona Wood, After Tupac and D Foster by Jacqueline Woodson

Week in Review: August 19

missprintweekreviewThis week on the blog you can check out:

*While you’re here you might want to enter by giveaway celebrating my blog turning ten!*

I’m really late posting this week in review but here it is. I think I might want to try a fountain pen and I’ve been chilling out and catching up on correspondence this week.

Here’s my latest from Instagram:

I posted a ton of photos from Gulliver’s Gate so if you’re into that you might want to check them out. Here’s the first one:

 

If you you want to see how my month in reading is shaking out be sure to check out my August Reading Tracker.

How was your week? What are you reading?

Let’s talk in the comments.

Uppercase July 2017 Box Review

After experimenting with Owlcrate for a few months last year, I decided to give Uppercase a shot this year when I wanted to check out a new bookish subscription box.

Uppercase is a monthly book subscription box.

You have two options when subscribing: You can purchase the Book Exclusive Plan for $17/month which includes a new hardcover YA novel (signed or with a bookplate), a reading experience content (this includes a bookmark with links to special content to check out while you read the book), and a handwritten note about the contents of the box. The Expert Plan is $23/month and includes all of the Book Exclusive items plus one or two bookish items which can be anything from notebooks to wearables. Both plans adds $6.50 for shipping.

What I really like about Uppercase is you have options for buying as well. You can subscribe monthly with the typical automatic renewals (and option to cancel) OR you can pre-pay for a certain amount of boxes from 1 to 12 months. I decided to pre-pay for three months and got my second package in July.

I already shared about the box on Instagram but I decided I could do a full review on here too.

Here’s what I found in my July 2017 Uppercase which comes in the signature Uppercase pouch (and is mailed in a Priority Mail padded envelope):

  • Words on Bathroom Walls by Julia Walton: Unlike the June package, July’s box had a book I’ve never heard of. That almost never happens to me! I probably wouldn’t have picked this one up on my own because it sounds sad but I’m game to see what it has in store and excited for the reading experience content.
  • Experience Bookmark: This is a special feature unique to Uppercase. The bookmark features page numbers and codes readers can enter online to unlock special content.
  • Sticker: The oversized cat sticker says “I love books.” It’s very cute but I have to admit I’m super not a cat person so this will probably be finding another home.
  • Socks: I always need new socks and I’m pretty happy with these Alice in Wonderland ones. They are a nice quality and look large enough to fit my big feet.
  • Postcard: It’s silly, but the postcard for Words in Deep Blue is one of my favorite things in this box. Cath Crowley is a long time favorite and I really enjoyed this book. I’m thrilled to have quote art from it.
  • Print: This print is an exclusive item with embossed artwork and fun lettering for Stephen King’s famous quote. I don’t have a lot of wall space right now but I might eventually get this and the postcard framed because I like them so much.

All in all I’m pretty happy with this book. The novelty of finding a completely new to me book was pretty great and I’m happy with the items. I really appreciate the option to pre-pay and may even order more boxes in the future. I like that it includes some extras without being overwhelming and I think it’s great that the books are signed. This is definitely a subscription box to consider for yourself or your bookish friends. Keep watching the blog for my review of my final Uppercase Box when it arrives in August!

Places No One Knows: A Chick Lit Wednesday Review

“I start, because if I don’t, then everything just stays the same.”

“I thought he made me a different person altogether, but maybe I was always holding those pieces inside me, waiting for a chance to use them.”

Waverly Camdenmar doesn’t sleep. She runs instead going as fast and as far as her legs will allow until she can’t think and the only option is collapse. Then the sun comes up, she pastes on her best face, and pretends everything is normal. It’s easy to hide behind her academic achievements and the popularity her best friend Maribeth so covets.

Marshall Holt is too apathetic to pretend anything is normal in his life or even remotely okay. Neither has been true about his family or his life for quite some time. He doesn’t care because he’s busy trying to lose himself in the oblivion of drinking too much, smoking too much, and making too many bad decisions. It’s been working great so far except for the whole maybe not graduating thing.

Waverly and Marshall are used to watching each other from afar–a little wary and a little hungry–but never anything more. Not until Waverly’s attempt at deep relaxation dreams her into Marshall’s bedroom and everything changes.

Now when the sun comes up Waverly’s carefully ordered world is stifling instead of safe. After years of trying not to feel anything, Marshall is feeling far too much. Waverly and Marshall thought they knew exactly who they were and who they could be. Now neither of them is sure what that means in Places No One Knows (2016) by Brenna Yovanoff.

Find it on Bookshop.

Yovanoff’s latest standalone novel is a razor sharp blend of contemporary and magic realism alternating between Waverly and Marshall’s first person narration. This character driven novel focuses on the ways their two personalities clash and intersect throughout their strange encounters.

Waverly is analytical and pragmatic. She knows that she is the smartest person in the room and she doesn’t care if that makes her threatening. Her sometime friends describe Waverly as a sociopath or a robot and she feels like she should care about that but it also seems to require too much effort.

Marshall, by contrast, is hyper-sensitive and philosophical and impractical. He doesn’t want to care about the way his family is falling apart or the way everything else in his life is crumbling. But he does care. A lot. And it’s wrecking him.

At its core Places No One Knows is a story about how two people engage with each other and also the greater world. Yovanoff’s writing is flawless with deliberate structure and scathing commentary both as a whole and on a sentence-by-sentence level. This story subverts gender roles and societal norms all in the guise of a slightly unconventional love story.

Places No One Knows is an excellent novel filled with fascinating characters. Although Waverly and Marshall’s relationship is a centerpiece of the story both characters also have their own stories to tell and their own journeys to make, which sometimes mirror each other and sometimes diverge, as they struggle to make the active choice to save themselves.

Possible Pairings: Take Me With You by Tara Altebrando, The Beauty of the Moment by Tanaz Bhatena, The Cruel Prince by Holly Black, Words in Deep Blue by Cath Crowley, The Fashion Committee by Susan Juby, The Last Time We Were Us by Leah Konen, But Then I Came Back by Estelle Laure, We Were Liars by E. Lockhart, All the Wind in the World by Samantha Mabry, One of Us is Lying by Karen M. McManus, When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon, The Square Root of Summer by Harriet Reuter Hapgood, Bone Gap by Laura Ruby, Tonight the Streets Are Ours by Leila Sales, Break Me Like a Promise by Tiffany Schmidt, All the Crooked Saints by Maggie Stiefvater, American Street by Ibi Zoboi