Ten Cents a Dance: A Review

Ten Cents a Dance by Christine FletcherChicago, 1941: When her mother becomes too sick to work, Ruby Jacinski knows it’s her responsibility to look after the family and make sure money is coming in. Ruby doesn’t mind dropping out of school. But working in the factory just about kills her. Leave it to Ruby and her fiery temper to lose a sweet spot slicing bacon and end up working in Pig’s Feet.

When a local legend and all-around tough guy suggests that Ruby could use her talents as a dance teacher to earn some real dough, Ruby jumps at the offer. But teaching dancing is the last thing on the clients’ minds when Ruby begins working as a taxi dancer.

With no other choices, Ruby immerses herself into the world of taxi dancing and learns the fine art of drawing extra gifts in the form of meals, clothes and even cash from her clients. Soon, Ruby is making more money than she could have imagined. Soon Ruby realizes that the unsavory aspects of her work are starting to stick to her as much as the stink of pickled pig’s feet used to. With no one else to help, Ruby knows that it’s her choice to make another change for herself in Ten Cents a Dance (2009) by Christine Fletcher.

Ten Cents a Dance was partly inspired by one of the authors relatives as detailed in the author’s note at the end of the novel.

Fletcher offers a well-researched novel that brings the world of the Chicago Yards neighborhood to life. Ruby is a tough as nails heroine who isn’t afraid to make hard choices to get what’s coming to her. If Ruby is coarse or gritty during the story it is because she has to be to survive.

While Ruby’s decisions are often fueled by impulsive judgments of painfully naive notions, she is a very authentic heroine and one that readers will understand. Although Ruby makes mistakes again and again (and again) during the narrative she always owns up to the them. She always acknowledges what she did and works to make it right.

Ten Cents a Dance is a vivid story of the darker side of pre-war Chicago. Sure to appeal to readers looking for a noirish read they can sink their teeth into.

Possible Pairings: Strings Attached by Judy Blundell, The Luxe by Anna Godbersen, Vixen by Jillian Larkin, The Bride’s Farewell by Meg Rosoff, Belle Epoque by Elizabeth Ross, Out of the Easy by Ruta Sepetys, Bowery Girl by Kim Taylor

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7 thoughts on “Ten Cents a Dance: A Review

  1. Great review! I checked this book out from a library years ago … be shocked I never got around to read it. But maybe it’s time to add it back onto the TBR list?!

    Liked by 1 person

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