Wuthering Heights: A Chick Lit Wednesday Review

When Mr. Earnshaw, a man of means, brings a dark, ill-mannered foundling into his home he has no idea that his one good deed will alter the course of his family forever.

Taken into the Earnshaw home only to be cast out abruptly, Heathcliff is intent to avenge himself on those who have done him wrong through any means possible. Even his oldest friend and companion Catherine is not beyond reproach.

Lockwood knows nothing of the scandal and unrest that surrounds Wuthering Heights when he leases Thrushcross Grange from Heathcliff for a season. Scandalized by the residents of Wuthering Heights and shocked by the blatant disregard for common courtesy and propriety, he soon endeavors to unearth the whole story from his housekeeper, Nelly Dean.

The story Nelly reveals is one of unresolved passion, haunting obsession, and a connection that even death cannot deny in Wuthering Heights (1847) by Emily Brontë.

Wuthering Heights is Brontë’s only novel.

Groundbreaking for its time, Wuthering Heights is a divisive novel that is more often regarded with love or hate rather than indifference.

Some claim Brontë’s gothic novel is a sweeping romance that spans not just years but death itself. Written in the first person with a framing story around the main drama of Catherine and Heathcliff’s doomed relationship, Brontë creates an evocative story filled with Yorkshire dialect and harsh lanscapes.

At the same time, this book is a study in human cruelty. Catherine and Heathcliff are horrible people and, even while proving their love for one another, they do unspeakable things.

If you can get past the basic meanness of almost all of the characters, Wuthering Heights is an atmospheric story filled with chills and menace sure to linger after the last page is finished.

Possible Pairings: Frost by Marianna Baer, Plain Kate by Erin Bow, The Wicked and the Just by J. Anderson Coats, Leverage by Joshua C. Cohen, The House of Dead Maids by Clare B. Dunkle, Swoon by Nina Malkin, Fury by Elizabeth Miles, Vicious by V. E. Schwab, Between by Jessica Warman, The Replacement by Brenna Yovanoff

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One thought on “Wuthering Heights: A Chick Lit Wednesday Review

  1. I went years feeling ashamed at how much I dislike this book. Since it was a classic, I assumed that I was somehow missing “the big point” and sounded ignorant when I hemmed and hawed when people asked my my opinion of it.

    As a senior in high-school I wrote a paper about it. About why it was awful and why I felt that way (long story short: deplorable people doing deplorable things to each other).

    I’ve never seen the attraction. It’s not a love story. It’s not a story where you get to the end and think “oh, I enjoyed that” or barring that, you don’t think “well, that sucked but I enjoyed the characters.” Because you didn’t. So the story sucked AND the characters were wretched…WHY?!? WHY READ THIS? WHY IS THIS SUBJECTIVELY “GOOD”???

    ahem…sorry. Anyway, yeah, color me “not a fan” and mystified by the attraction.

    Like

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